Featured Links


Plan Your Visit
E-newsletter Sign-up
Explore Museum Exhibits
Browse Photos
Visit Press Room
Become a Volunteer
Air Force Museum Foundation

North American X-10

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American X-10 at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American X-10 at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American X-10 at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American X-10 at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the North American X-10 into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 14, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

North American X-10 in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

North American X-10 in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The X-10 could be remotely controlled from the ground or another aircraft, or it could guide itself. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The X-10 could be remotely controlled from the ground or another aircraft, or it could guide itself. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The X-10 took off and landed on its own undercarriage and deployed a parachute to shorten its landing roll. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The X-10 took off and landed on its own undercarriage and deployed a parachute to shorten its landing roll. (U.S. Air Force photo)


The turbojet-powered X-10 tested flight characteristics and guidance, navigation and control systems for the planned SM-64 Navaho. The Navaho was intended to be a ramjet-powered, nuclear-armed cruise missile launched by rocket boosters.

North American built 13 X-10s (10 of which were test flown), and the first X-10 flight occurred in October 1953. Although accidents destroyed several X-10s, the test program proved to be successful. One X-10 flew at Mach 2.05, a remarkable achievement for the time. In 1957, however, the Navaho program was cancelled as Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) technology matured.

The remaining X-10s were used to support the XB-70 program and as targets for Surface-to-Air Missiles (SAMs) then in development. The museum’s X-10 is the only one still in existence.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Engines:
Two Westinghouse XJ40s of 10,000 lbs. thrust each (with afterburner)
Maximum speed: 1,300 mph
Range: 400 miles
Service ceiling: 45,000 feet
Weight: 40,000 lbs.

Click here to return to the Research & Development Gallery.