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American Expeditionary Forces Field Service Postcard

This concise, standardized postcard was developed by American commanders to improve morale and hasten the line of communication between troops at the Front and their nervous families waiting back home. Regular use of this card streamlined postal correspondence and gave hard-pressed censors a needed break in sanitizing leaked operational details from thousands of letters sent home daily. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This concise, standardized postcard was developed by American commanders to improve morale and hasten the line of communication between troops at the Front and their nervous families waiting back home. Regular use of this card streamlined postal correspondence and gave hard-pressed censors a needed break in sanitizing leaked operational details from thousands of letters sent home daily. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This concise, standardized postcard was developed by American commanders to improve morale and hasten the line of communication between troops at the Front and their nervous families waiting back home. Regular use of this card streamlined postal correspondence and gave hard-pressed censors a needed break in sanitizing leaked operational details from thousands of letters sent home daily. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This concise, standardized postcard was developed by American commanders to improve morale and hasten the line of communication between troops at the Front and their nervous families waiting back home. Regular use of this card streamlined postal correspondence and gave hard-pressed censors a needed break in sanitizing leaked operational details from thousands of letters sent home daily. (U.S. Air Force photo)


Note: This item is currently in storage.

This concise, standardized postcard was developed by American commanders to improve morale and hasten the line of communication between troops at the Front and their nervous families waiting back home. Regular use of this card streamlined postal correspondence and gave hard-pressed censors a needed break in sanitizing leaked operational details from thousands of letters sent home daily.

Operational security was paramount; as a result, the postcard offered little opportunity for personalization and allowed soldiers to only choose from a short list of approved statements.

This field service postcard was completed and mailed home by Lt. John A. Talcott in June 1918.

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