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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked QuestionsIf your question relates specifically to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, please see the topics below.

If you have a question that is not addressed here, you may find the answer by visiting the main Air Force website.

Topics

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Are museum aircraft restored to airworthy status?
While most of the aircraft at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force have the potential to be made airworthy, our conservation and restoration work is directed at preserving the historical integrity and accuracy of an aircraft rather than achieving modern airworthiness. In preserving historical accuracy, we choose to use original parts that may be unserviceable or non-airworthy, rather than modern substitutes.  The Memphis Belle, for example, will use wiring made to original wartime specification, which does not meet today’s flight standards, rather than wiring used in modern aircraft. This is vital to our mission of preserving the record copies of these aircraft for future generations to come.

Tell me more about the aircraft markings.
The markings for the flights to Hanoi are indeed an important part of the artifact’s provenance.  As required by best museum practices and Air Force regulations, however, the C-141C Hanoi Taxi must be accurately marked for its current configuration. Since the aircraft was significantly modified between 1973 and 2006—including a considerably lengthened fuselage and a distinctive aerial refueling receptacle fairing—it would be inaccurate and misleading to paint it exactly as it appeared in 1973.  Also, the C-141C flew for four years with the paint scheme currently displayed, which is another part of the aircraft’s history as the last operational C-141 in the Air Force inventory.   

As exhibitry is developed in the future, imagery and interpretation about its appearance in 1973 will be included to tell this meaningful part of the Hanoi Taxi’s story.

Is the museum accredited?
Yes, the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Of the nation's nearly 17,500 museums, about 775, or 4 percent, are currently accredited.
What is the Air Force Museum Foundation?
The Air Force Museum Foundation, Inc. was established in 1960 as a philanthropic, nonprofit organization to assist the Air Force in the development and expansion of the facilities of the National Museum of the United States Air Force and to undertake and advance programs and activities supporting the museum.

The Foundation runs the Air Force Museum Theatre, flight simulators, museum store, Valkyrie Cafe and the Friends Program. To find out more about the Foundation, visit www.afmuseum.com.

How do I become a Friend of the Museum?
For information on becoming a "Friend of the Museum," call (937) 258-1218 or visit the Air Force Museum Foundation website.
Tell me more about the digital 3D theatre.
The 400-seat Air Force Museum Theatre shows 3D films on a massive 80 foot by 60 foot screen -- the largest in southwest Ohio. A variety of shows are offered throughout the day, seven days a week. For current prices and film showings, or for reservations, call (937) 253-4629 or visit the Air Force Museum Foundation website. Group and student rates are available.
Are there any aircraft cockpits or interiors open?
Yes, the interior of the four primary presidential aircraft (VC-54, VC-118, VC-121 and VC-137) are open to the public. Visitors can walk through three cargo aircraft; Fairchild C-82 Packet, Lockheed C-130E Hercules, and the Lockheed C-141C Starlifter. Visitors can also walk through a B-29 fuselage and sit in two cockpit mock-ups (F-16 and F-4).

How can I get permission to view the interior of other aircraft?
Due to the museum's commitment to preserve aircraft and artifacts, the policy is that access to these exhibit items will not be permitted.

Professional photographers or production companies wishing to photograph or film aircraft interiors should first review the Request to Film / Request to Photograph forms. Please contact the Public Affairs Division at (937) 255-4704 or at nationalmuseum.mup@us.af.mil for additional information.
Can you direct me to other aviation museums?
A list of USAF Field Museums, other military aviation museums and civilian aviation museums that display items on loan from the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is included on this website. Click here to view a list of aviation museum links.
Is their a minimum age for museum visitors?
Children and adults of all ages are welcome at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.

Minor children who are between 14 and 18 years old are permitted to tour the museum without adult supervision. Unfortunately, due to legal concerns, we cannot permit children under the age of 14 into the museum without an adult chaperone.

As with all visitors, the museum reserves the right to restrict access to those who do not follow the rules of decorum.

Do you have strollers available for my use?
There is a limited supply of strollers available free of charge on a first-come, first-served basis. Please bring your own stroller if possible.

Why must participants be at least 12 years of age to go on a Behind the Scenes Tour?
The rule set forward regarding age restrictions for the Behind the Scenes Tour is a regulation implemented by OSHA. The restoration area is an active, industrial work environment and as such is subject to policies prohibiting persons under the age of 12 from entering.
How do I donate an item to the museum?
If you would like to donate an item(s) to the museum, we ask that you please send an email to nationalmuseum.donations@us.af.mil or send a letter to:

National Museum of the USAF
Collection Management Division
Attn: Donation Offers
1100 Spaatz Street
Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433

Can’t I just mail or drop off a donation to the museum?
No, the museum does not accept unsolicited donations. Once a donation offer has been accepted by the Collection Committee, you will be given instructions on how to mail/ship the donation to us. Donations can only be dropped off at the museum front desk after written coordination/confirmation with a museum curator or registrar.

What kind of items does the museum look for?
The museum looks for items that help broaden and enrich the history of the United States Air Force. These items can be in the form of uniform items, memorabilia, equipment, photographs, personal papers, etc. We look at every donation individually to see if it meets our collection needs and fits our mission to tell the story of the Air Force. In addition, we have a donation wish list (looking for specific items) on our website that is updated regularly.

Does the museum accept long term loans?
It is against policy to accept personal loans of historical property. Such loans impose a significant administrative burden on the museum as well as other responsibilities and are contrary to best practices as advocated by the American Alliance of Museums.

Does the museum accept artwork?
The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force normally does not collect art. We refer donors to the United States Air Force Art Program that is better suited to accept this kind of donation. The Art Program presents the story of the Air Force and its rich aviation history to both the military and the public through art.

Who reviews donation offers?
All donations are reviewed by the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Collection Committee prior to acceptance. The Collection Committee consists of the senior curator along with members representing multiple museum divisions.

Why is the museum so picky in what it accepts?
The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force collection contains more than 135,000 items, including over 2,700 aerospace vehicles and missiles along with more than 400,000 photographs, nearly 9 million documents, and over 5,000 books. While we wish we could accept any and all offers, we have neither the storage capability nor the staff and budget resources to maintain such an enormous undertaking.

What is the process once I donate something to NMUSAF?
Once an item is received by either the Collection Management or Research Division, you will be notified. The accessioning process, in which the item(s) are catalogued into the collection, will then begin. The accessioning process includes identification, research, cataloging, photographing, tagging and storage. Once this is completed, usually in about 45 days, you will receive an acknowledgement letter and gift list for your records.

Will my items be exhibited?
The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force cannot guarantee that any donated item will ever be placed on exhibit. Exhibits are subject to both budget concerns and changing planning needs. Like most other museums only a small percentage of our collection (about 8%) is on exhibit. The rest is in secure storage and is used for research, future exhibit needs and as a historical study collection.

Can the museum do an appraisal of my donation?
The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force cannot provide monetary appraisals to individuals on their donated items. However, there are professional appraisers that will perform this service for a fee. You can contact one of these organizations for appraisers in your area:

American Society of Appraisers
International Society of Appraisers
Appraisers Association of America

Note: No federal endorsement of these organizations is implied.
Where is the museum located?
The museum's entrance is located off Springfield Pike at historic Wright Field (Gate 28B), approximately six miles northeast of Dayton, Ohio. The museum's mailing address is 1100 Spaatz Street, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base OH 45433. (Note: If this address does not work in your GPS, you may try entering in the address of the building across the street from the museum at 5717 Huberville Ave., Riverside OH 45431, or the coordinates of Latitude: 39.7811, Longitude: -84.1101)

How do I get to the museum?
Directions and a map are available on our Directions page.
How do I register my school or youth group for museum educational programs?
The museum offers many programs for students and adults. School groups should view the For Schools & Educators page of the website. Scout and youth groups should view the For Scouts, Youth Groups & Families page.
Where can I find out about employment opportunities at the museum?
For employment postings, please visit www.usajobs.gov, the official job site of the U.S. Federal Government.
Can I fly to the museum?
Unfortunately, it is not possible to fly a private aircraft to the museum. Dayton International and Xenia/Greene County are the two closest public airports to the museum. Their websites should have information about shuttles or other ground transportation.

Does the museum ever host fly-ins?
The museum does host a World War I Dawn Patrol Rendezvous (biennial event), which takes place in a turf flying field area with aircraft that do not require a hard surface for landing. Please visit the Outdoor Aviation Events page for more information about this event.
Can I bring food and drinks to the museum?
The museum has outdoor picnic areas available. Food and drink, including bottled water, are not permitted inside the museum.

Does the museum have a cafeteria?
The Air Force Museum Foundation runs a cafeteria on the second floor of the museum, as well as a Refueling Cafe, serving snacks and drinks, on the balcony overlooking the Cold War Gallery. Cafe hours and menus are available on the Foundation's website. Please note that unless prior arrangements have been made, sack lunches are not permitted in the cafe due to its limited seating capacity. To contact the museum's cafe, please call (937) 255-2735.

Is there anywhere else to eat lunch near the museum?
Besides the two cafes located inside the museum, there are several restaurants within a five-minute drive of the museum grounds.
What type of information do foreign visitors need to visit the museum?
Foreign visitors (non-U.S. citizens) are required to show a passport or green card (original only -- no photocopies) in order to ride the shuttle bus to the Behind the Scenes Tour at the Restoration facility. No identification is required to visit the main museum complex.
How much is admission?
Admission to the museum and parking are FREE.

What hours are the museum open?
The museum is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week. The museum is closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year's Day.

Some museum exhibits have special hours. The 8th Air Force Control Tower and Nissen Hut, located in the Air Park, are open from noon to 4 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday from January through March (closed Monday through Thursday) and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily April through December.

How long does it take to see everything?
It is difficult to say, but we recommend planning for the entire day.

May I bring backpacks or large bags to the museum?
Please note that for security reasons, all bags are subject to search, and weapons are not permitted within the museum. In addition, all adults may be asked to show their picture identification card upon entering the museum. Lockers are available for a small fee.
Can you recommend lodging during my visit?
Unfortunately, we cannot recommend lodging. As a government institution, the museum is not permitted to endorse commercial establishments. We suggest you check with the local convention and visitors bureaus (CVBs):

Dayton/Montgomery County CVB
Greene County CVB
Butler County Visitors Bureau
Greater Springfield CVB
Miami County CVB
Warren County CVB

Can I park my motorhome overnight at the museum?
Overnight parking is not permitted at the museum.

Which RV parks or campgrounds are located near the museum?
Here is a list of several area RV parks and campgrounds. Please contact the individual locations for more information.

Bass Lake Campground
756 Hillard St., Springfield OH 45506
(937) 323-2981

Cricket Holler Boy Scout Camp
4999 Northcutt Place, P.O. Box 13057, Dayton OH 45413
(937) 278-4825, ext. 228

Dayton Tall Timbers Resort KOA
7996 Weilbaum Rd., Brookville OH
(937) 833-3888 or (800) KOA-3317

Enon Beach Recreation Area
2401 Enon Rd., Springfield OH 45502
(937) 882-6431

Huber Mobile Home Park
4311 E. Kitridge Rd., Dayton OH 45424
(937) 233-8822

John Bryan State Park
3790 SR 370, Yellow Springs OH 45387
(937) 767-1274

WPAFB Family Campground
Services, Area C, Bldg 95, WPAFB OH
(937) 257-4374
**REQUIRES DoD ID** (military or military retired)

Note: No federal endorsement of parks/campgrounds implied.
Why is the Memphis Belle so unique?
The Memphis Belle, a B-17F Flying Fortress, is one of the most famous aircraft in history. In May 1943 it became the first U.S. Army Air Forces heavy bomber to complete 25 missions over Europe and return to the United States. At the time, completing 25 missions was an important milestone in a combat tour -- it meant that the Airmen could come home.

Upon its return to the United States in June 1943, the Memphis Belle's crew flew the aircraft across the country on a three-month war bond and morale boosting tour. With the bond tour and the 1944 William Wyler documentary film titled "The Memphis Belle" -- depicting actual combat footage -- the aircraft and its crew became widely known and celebrated. In 1990 a major motion picture of the same name added to their fame.

Click here for additional information about the Memphis Belle.

How did the Memphis Belle get its name?
The pilot of the Memphis Belle, then-Lt. Robert Morgan, named the aircraft after his wartime girlfriend, Margaret Polk, of Memphis, Tenn. Morgan chose the artwork from a 1941 George Petty illustration in Esquire magazine.

When did the Memphis Belle arrive at the museum?
The Boeing B-17F Memphis Belle arrived at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in October 2005. It has been undergoing a full restoration since that time.

How did the museum obtain the Memphis Belle?
The Memphis Belle was located in Memphis, Tenn., from 1946 until 2005. The Memphis Belle Memorial Association Inc., the Memphis Belle War Memorial Foundation and Memphis community were given the opportunity to develop, fund and implement plans for the proper restoration and exhibit of the Belle. However, they were unable to do so, so the aircraft was recalled to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in 2005. As a prominent and famous part of the national collection of the U.S. Air Force, the Memphis Belle deserves a level of care and public visibility befitting its proud history and identity as an icon of American air power.

I’ve seen the Memphis Belle at air shows. Is it the original?
No, the B-17 with "Memphis Belle" markings seen at many air shows is not the original aircraft. It is a later model B-17 which was used in the movie "The Memphis Belle." The original Memphis Belle is located at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, where it is undergoing restoration.

How long is the restoration expected to last? When will the Memphis Belle be placed on display?
The complete exterior and interior restoration of the Memphis Belle is expected to take several more years. Plans call for the aircraft to be placed on display in the museum’s World War II Gallery in May 2018 to coincide with the 75th anniversary of the aircraft and crew’s 25th missions.

Initially the museum released that the Memphis Belle would be on display in late 2014/early 2015. Why has the restoration been delayed?
All of the museum's restoration timeline projections are preliminary. However, as we move forward, we are better able to project anticipated completion dates. While the museum tentatively projected the Memphis Belle to be placed on display in late 2014/early 2015, a variety of factors, including the time needed to efficiently complete both the exterior and interior restoration, as well as the manpower necessary to finish restoration projects needed for the museum's new fourth building and other tasks, resulted in a later roll-out date than originally anticipated. Plans now call for the aircraft to be placed on display in the museum's World War II Gallery in May 2018.

Can I see the aircraft while it is being restored?
Yes, visitors who are interested in seeing the Memphis Belle during the restoration process must sign up for the museum's Behind the Scenes Tours. The tours take place at 12:15 p.m. every Friday (some exceptions) and give visitors a look at the museum's restoration hangars. The tour is free, participants must be at least 12 years old, and advanced registration is required. Register online or call (937) 656-9436.

The museum also offers online updates on the Memphis Belle restoration process on its Restoration Projects page.

Will the aircraft be restored to airworthy status?
The Memphis Belle will be restored as close to original condition as possible and will be for static display purposes only due to its historical significance. While most of the aircraft at the museum have the potential to be made airworthy, our conservation and restoration work is directed at preserving the historical integrity and accuracy of an aircraft, rather than achieving modern airworthiness. In preserving historical accuracy, we choose to use original parts that may be unserviceable or non-airworthy, rather than modern substitutes. The Memphis Belle, for example, will use wiring made to original wartime specification, which does not meet today's flight standards, rather than wiring used in modern aircraft. This is vital to our mission of preserving the record copies of these aircraft for future generations to come.

Where have the parts for the restoration come from?
Parts not already available are being donated and purchased. In addition, our restoration staff has fabricated parts during some of the restoration.

Can you estimate what percentage of the completed Memphis Belle were original to the aircraft or vintage World War II parts?
Approximately 95 percent of the completed restoration will be vintage parts from the World War II era.

Who is doing the restoration?
Both professional museum restoration staff and technically qualified volunteers are working on the Memphis Belle's restoration.

What will happen to the B-17 that is currently on display in the World War II Gallery?
The B-17G Shoo Shoo Shoo Baby that is currently on display in the museum's World War II Gallery will be transferred to the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum.

Where can I find more information and/or photos of the Memphis Belle?
The museum has a fact sheet with a number of photos and videos available on its website.

Is the museum planning to hold a special event when the Memphis Belle is placed on display?
The museum recognizes the roll-out of the Memphis Belle will be a significant event and one of great interest to the public. While it is premature to speculate on the scope of the event, it will be considered a major part of the museum's 2018 programs.
Who do I contact for military reunion information?
Call (937) 255-1712 or e-mail nationalmuseum.mus@us.af.mil, or click here more information on planning a reunion at the museum.
Can modelers take detailed photos of aircraft at the museum?
Because of the large number of requests we receive from modelers, museum staff cannot support requests for special access. Modelers, as well as other visitors, are welcome to take photographs from outside the railings in the museum galleries.

Can scale modelers get three-view drawings, detailed photographs, paint schemes, etc. from the museum?
Because of the overwhelming demand for this type of information, museum staff cannot support modelers' requests. The growing number of commercial publications containing this information is now filling the needs of most modelers. Detailed construction drawings and technical information is made available by the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum.

Does the museum ever host model airplane events?
Every other year over Labor Day weekend, the museum hosts the Giant Scale Radio-Controlled Model Aircraft Air Show. The show is sponsored by the Dayton Ohio Giant Scalers and features radio-controlled model aircraft from all eras.

What events are coming up at the museum?
Please see the Upcoming section of the website.

Can I have my event at the museum?
The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is a federally owned and operated facility. Therefore, by regulation, certain types of events and activities are prohibited at the museum. Some of the types of prohibited events are as follows:

   - Non-military/private organization events
   - Fundraising and non-profit events
   - Holiday parties
   - Weddings and wedding receptions
   - Funerals
   - Political events
   - Gambling events
   - Religious events

If you have additional questions, please contact the Special Events Division at nationalmuseum.mus@us.af.mil.

Why was there a need for a fourth building?
The climate-controlled fourth building gives the museum dedicated gallery space to present the Air Force’s past, present and future in space and the opportunity to consolidate the presidential and research and development aircraft, which were previously located on the controlled-access portion of Wright-Patterson AFB, to the museum’s main campus. In addition, the Air Force’s airlift and aeromedical evacuation mission will be explained.

How large is the building?
The fourth building is 224,000 square feet and is similar in size and shape to the museum’s three other hangars.

What will people see in the new building?
There are four galleries in the new building – Presidential, Research and Development, Space and Global Reach, and visitors can see 10 presidential aircraft, a world-class collection of flight test aircraft, exciting space artifacts and huge cargo planes. Visitors can climb aboard the space shuttle exhibit, walk through four presidential and three cargo aircraft, and try out the Air Force Museum Foundation’s new suite of simulator rides. Click here to see photos of the fourth building.

For a complete list of aircraft and exhibits in each gallery, click on the gallery names.

Research and Development Gallery
The world’s largest collection of test aircraft under one roof is on display in the R&D Gallery. The centerpiece of the gallery is the world’s only remaining XB-70A Valkyrie. A very popular artifact for visitors, the Mach 3 (2,000+ mph) Valkyrie was a highly-advanced aircraft tested in the 1960s.The R&D Gallery’s diverse collection ranges from World War II up to the present, representing advances in technological problem solving and increasing the museum’s opportunities to teach STEM themes and principles.

Space Gallery
The Space Gallery showcases the Space Shuttle Exhibit featuring NASA’s first Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT), which was used to train space shuttle astronauts for their missions. The exhibit allows visitors to experience a full-size representation of a NASA space shuttle payload bay, which displays a Teal Ruby satellite, and look into the flight deck and mid-deck levels of the CCT. The gallery also includes the massive 96-ton Titan IVB space launch vehicle, Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft, and several experimental aircraft and even balloon gondolas that helped pave the way to space flight.  Formerly top-secret satellites and related items will showcase the Air Force’s vast reconnaissance, early warning, communications and other space-based capabilities.

Global Reach Gallery
An important element of Air Force history is told in the
Global Reach Gallery. Providing airlift remains a major mission of the U.S. Air Force and it forms a critical part of the Air Force’s ability to maintain global reach. Visitors will be able to walk through three of the four aircraft featured in this gallery – the C-141C Hanoi Taxi, which airlifted the first American prisoners of war to freedom from Gia Lam Airport in Hanoi, North Vietnam, in 1973, as well as the C-82 and C-130E. The gallery also includes the C-21, which was used for airlift and aeromedical evacuations.

Presidential Gallery
The museum is the repository for Air Force aircraft that have been retired from the presidential aircraft fleet.
The Presidential Gallery features 10 historical aircraft representing more than 70 years of dedicated presidential service. Visitors can walk through four of them, including the VC-54C Sacred Cow used by President Roosevelt, the VC-121E Columbine III used by President Eisenhower, the VC-118 The Independence used by President Truman and the VC-137C, also known as Air Force One, Special Air Mission (SAM) 26000, that served eight presidents including Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Clinton. SAM 26000 carried President Kennedy’s body back to Washington, D.C. from Dallas after his assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, and served as the location where President Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as the new president.

What are some of the educational opportunities available in the new building?
A great feature in the fourth building is the addition of three dedicated, interactive educational spaces, known as STEM Learning Nodes. These “gallery classrooms” accommodate student-centered, technology-enhanced learning through hands-on programs, demonstrations and lectures. When the museum’s Education Division is not using them for structured programming, the museum will be able to offer a variety of programs to visitors such as science and engineering demonstrations, hands-on activities, special presentations, videos and more.

Besides the aircraft walk-throughs, what other things can visitors do in the fourth building?
In addition to walking through the Space Shuttle Exhibit, four presidential and three cargo aircraft, visitors can try out landing a shuttle orbiter in the free Space Shuttle Landing Experience. Also in the fourth building are new simulator rides from the Air Force Museum Foundation. The Pulseworks Virtual Reality Transporter gives visitors a Space Voyage experience where they can see in all directions within a 3D world via high-tech goggles. An Eight Seat Pod, or ESP, motion ride offers an automated experience where the capsule moves up and down and side-to-side to capture the feeling of really flying.

How much did the building cost and how was it funded?
The fourth building was privately financed by the Air Force Museum Foundation, Inc., an IRS Section 501(c)(3) non-profit organization chartered to assist the National Museum of the United States Air Force with the development and expansion of facilities. The Foundation gifted $40.8 million for fourth building pre-construction, construction and administration costs as well as additional options and requirements.

Why did the museum decide to move the presidential and R&D aircraft into the fourth building?
The decision to move the presidential and R&D aircraft into the fourth building was driven by the desire to display the world’s largest museum collection of U.S. presidential and R&D aircraft together under one roof in the main facility, as these collections are highly regarded by our visitors. This allows all visitors to have the opportunity to see these aircraft and helps the museum to minimize shuttle bus expenditures.

Were all of the aircraft displayed in the hangars on Wright-Patterson AFB moved into the fourth building?
Nearly all of the aircraft that were on display in those hangars were relocated to the fourth building. The Piper PA48 Enforcer and De Havilland DH 89 Dominie are currently in storage, the F-100D and Fairchild Model 24-C8F will eventually go on display in the Cold War Gallery, and the Piper J3 will go on display in the World War II Gallery.

Is it possible to see aircraft that remain in storage?
Some aircraft located in the restoration facility are available for view during the museum’s Behind the Scenes tours. Aircraft placed in other storage facilities are unavailable to the public.

What will happen to the hangars on Wright-Patterson AFB that housed the Presidential and R&D Galleries?
These hangars will be used by the museum for storage.

Are there any items in the new building that were not previously on display?
The museum has thousands of items in storage, and only about 7% of the artifacts that are in the collection here on the museum’s main campus are on display. The Titan IVB space launch vehicle is one example of an artifact that was previously in storage and is now on display in the fourth building.

Does the museum still plan to get a C-5 and/or KC-135?
In order to make room for the R&D aircraft in the fourth building, acquisition of some global reach aircraft that were originally planned for that building, such as the still active C-5 and KC-135, are being deferred until they can be accommodated.

I’ve heard a little about the retirement of the current Air Force Ones in the news recently. Could the museum get a VC-25 one day?
We are definitely interested in acquiring a VC-25 to include with the presidential collection in the fourth building. Right now, there is not a specific date when the VC-25s will become available, but we expect that at some point during the next decade.

With the museum now being even larger, is there a plan to accommodate visitors with mobility problems?
Additional electric carts and charging stations have been added, and the museum is developing further options that will assist visitors who have mobility concerns.

Where do I park and how do I get to the fourth building?
Visitors will continue to park in the visitor parking lot on the southwest side of the building and enter through the main museum lobby.

The lighting seems brighter in the fourth building than the rest of the museum. Why is there such a difference?
The museum’s exhibit lighting is made up of three major subsets: theatrical overhead lighting, artifact case lighting and wall lights for illumination of exhibit text panels. Previously the museum relied on lighting fixtures that gave off ultraviolet radiation and were harmful to many of the artifacts. Therefore we began looking for lighting alternatives that would preserve the museum’s collection, adequately light our artifacts and provide energy savings. LED technology was identified as the best solution, and we began using LED lighting in all new exhibits.

The fourth building features 100 percent LED lighting and we plan to convert all of our exhibit lighting to LED technology as funding and manpower allow.

How do I contact the Museum Store?
Call (937) 255-6505 or write Air Force Museum Store, Box 33624, Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433. Some orders can be placed online at http://store.airforcemuseum.com.
Are there any tours or events scheduled during my visit?
Five free USAF Heritage Tours are offered each day and last approximately one hour and 30 minutes. Advance registration is not necessary.

A Behind the Scenes Tour takes place at 12:15 p.m. almost every Friday. This tour gives visitors a look at the museum's restoration hangars. The tour is free, but advanced registration is required. Click here for additional instructions and to register online or call (937) 656-9436 for more information.

School, Scout and youth group tours must be arranged through the museum's Education Division.

Please visit the Upcoming page for information about upcoming events.

How long does it take to see everything?
It is difficult to say, but we recommend planning for the entire day.

Why must participants be at least 12 years of age to go on a Behind the Scenes Tour?
The rule set forward regarding age restrictions for the Behind the Scenes Tour is a regulation implemented by OSHA. The restoration area is an active, industrial work environment and as such is subject to policies prohibiting persons under the age of 12 from entering.
Can I bring my pet to the museum?
The museum does not have facilities for pets as we are unable accommodate their needs. Pets are not permitted to be in the museum, the Air Park, the Memorial Park or other areas where memorials are on display. Wright-Patterson Air Force Base policy prohibits leaving pets unattended in vehicles. Only assistance animals are permitted within the museum complex.

There are facilities in the Dayton area that lodge animals at an hourly rate. If you would like information about pet lodging facilities, please contact the Dayton/Montgomery County Convention and Visitors Bureau at (800) 221-8235.

Can I download photographs from this website?
Information presented on this website is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Use of appropriate byline/photo/image credits is requested. Many images displayed include a downloadable high-resolution version. To download a high-resolution image, click the "Download Full Image" link beneath the image. A new browser window will open, right click for Windows or hold click for Macintosh systems, then select "save image as" and save to your computer.

Can you provide historical photographs for a book/article?
We do not have the capacity to reproduce imagery except for official government requests. Visiting researchers may use our copy stand with their own cameras and film or digital recording device. Official U.S. Air Force photography can be obtained from the following locations.

Air Force photographs and film pre-1981 are available from the National Archives.

Air Force photographs and film post-1981 are available from Defense Imagery.

Additional aviation-related photography is available from the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum.

Can you provide historical film footage?
We do not have the capacity to reproduce imagery except for official government requests. Official U.S. Air Force film footage can be obtained from the following locations:

Air Force photographs and film pre-1981 are available from the National Archives.

Air Force photographs and film post-1981 are available from Defense Imagery.

Can I take photographs or film at the museum?
Yes, individuals are permitted to take their own photographs or videos while they are at the museum.

Professional photographers or production companies wishing to photograph or film at the museum should first review the Request to Film / Request to Photograph forms. Please contact the Public Affairs Division at (937) 255-1337, (937) 255-1386 or (937) 255-1283 or at nationalmuseum.mup@us.af.mil for additional information.

Do you have any tips for taking photographs at the museum?
The museum's theatrical lighting may pose a challenge to some photographers. Here are a few hints that may help:

1) Bring a tripod, if possible.

2) Turn off the flash on your camera, especially if you're taking pictures of artifacts behind Plexiglass.

3) If you are buying a disposable camera, choose one with 800 ASA or higher film.

4) The Early Years, World War II and Cold War Galleries are lit mostly with incandescent lighting.

5) The Korean War and Southeast Asia War Galleries use mercury vapor lighting, so visitors with digital cameras should adjust the white balance for fluorescent lights. Film users may want to try Tungsten film or an 80-b filter.

The lighting seems brighter in the fourth building than the rest of the museum. Why is there such a difference?
The museum’s exhibit lighting is made up of three major subsets: theatrical overhead lighting, artifact case lighting and wall lights for illumination of exhibit text panels. Previously the museum relied on lighting fixtures that gave off ultraviolet radiation and were harmful to many of the artifacts. Therefore we began looking for lighting alternatives that would preserve the museum’s collection, adequately light our artifacts and provide energy savings. LED technology was identified as the best solution, and we began using LED lighting in all new exhibits.

The fourth building features 100 percent LED lighting and we plan to convert all of our exhibit lighting to LED technology as funding and manpower allow.

Is public transportation available to and from the museum?
Taxi and bus service is available to and from the museum.

For bus routes or park-and-ride information, visit the RTA website.

A list of Dayton area taxi services is available on the Dayton International Airport website.
Can I get an answer to a research question by e-mail or phone?
All research requests must be written and sent via regular mail. Mail requests to Research Division, National Museum of the United States Air Force, 1100 Spaatz Street, Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-7102.

Can I order copies of technical information, manuals or reports?
Unfortunately, we are not equipped to provide the public with photocopies of archival documents maintained in the museum's collection. For example, we are unable to provide copies of Aircraft Technical Orders, Technical Manuals or Foreign Aircraft Evaluation Data. The only way to access this material is to schedule an appointment to visit the Research Division in person. In most cases, documents maintained by the Research Division are also publicly available through the National Archives, Library of Congress and the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum.

Can you provide historical photographs or film footage for a book/article?
Please refer to the Photography, Filming and Lighting topic.

Do you have service records, unit histories, U.S. Air Force accident reports or Missing Air Crew Reports (MACR)?
Military service records are kept at the National Archives. Unit histories are kept at the Air Force Historical Research Center. Air Force accident reports are kept at the USAF Safety Center. MACRs are filed in several locations, including the National Archives and the Air Force Historical Research Center.

I'm a scale modeler and I need three view drawings, detailed photographs, paint schemes, etc. Can I get them from the Research Division?
Because of the overwhelming demand for this type of information, museum staff cannot support modelers' requests. The growing number of commercial publications containing this information is now filling the needs of most modelers. Detailed construction drawings and technical information is made available by the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum.

I'm looking for information about a family member who once served in the Air Force. How can I get a copy of their personnel records?
When an individual is separated from military service (because of retirement, discharge from active duty or death), his/her Field Personnel File (containing all military and health records) is forwarded for storage to the National Personnel Records Center. This information is made available to family members as outlined on their website.

What other sites have information on aviation history?
Air Force History
Air Force Historical Foundation
Air Force Historical Research Agency
Air Force Historical Studies Division
Air National Guard History Program
Air Force Reserve History
Defense Imagery
Defense Technical Information Center 
Library of Congress
National Archives & Record Administration
National Naval Aviation Museum
National Personnel Records Center
Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum
Wright Brothers Collection at Wright State University
Where can I find information about current restoration projects?
Information about current restoration projects is available on the Restoration Projects page.

Can the public view current restoration projects at the museum?
A Behind the Scenes Tour of the museum's restoration hangars takes place at 12:15 p.m. every Friday (some exceptions). The tour is free, but advance registration is required. Click here for additional instructions and to register online or call (937) 656-9436 for more information.

Why must participants be at least 12 years of age to go on a Behind the Scenes Tour?
The rule set forward regarding age restrictions for the Behind the Scenes Tour is a regulation implemented by OSHA. The restoration area is an active, industrial work environment and as such is subject to policies prohibiting persons under the age of 12 from entering.
Does the museum offer programs for Scout groups?
Please see the For Scouts, Youth Groups & Families page.

I am a scout master; can my troop camp overnight on base?

For information, please contact the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Outdoor Recreation Division at (937) 257-9889 or visit http://www.88thfss.com/outdoorrecreation.html.

Is smoking permitted on museum grounds?
The use of tobacco products and electronic cigarettes is only permitted in designated outdoor smoking areas, in accordance with Air Force guidance.
Can I copy/use information from this website?
This website is provided as a public service by the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Information presented on www.nationalmuseum.af.mil is considered public information and may be distributed or copied. Please credit the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

Can I add a link to the museum on my own site?
Yes, provided it is not in a frame.

Can you add a link to my site?
In most instances, we cannot. There are many aviation-related portal sites that do a good job of consolidating links, much better than we could. Also, Air Force rules restrict the types of sites we can link to. In general, we only link to large government aviation, space and museum sites.

How do I report a problem with the website?
Website comments and suggestions should be directed to the webmaster.

Is every aircraft listed in an aircraft gallery on the website on public display?
Although we make every effort to keep the website as up-to-date as possible, the museum moves aircraft on and off public display for a variety of reasons. Although most aircraft and missiles represented in the aircraft galleries are on public display, some have been removed and placed in storage.

Why isn't a specific event/aircraft covered on this website?
The website history pages are intended as a broad introduction to Air Force history. They are neither complete nor comprehensive.