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BRIG. GEN. ROBIN OLDS: COMBAT LEADER AND FIGHTER ACE

Posted 3/30/2011 Printable Fact Sheet
 
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Col. Robin Olds
Col. Robin Olds. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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Brig. Gen. Robin Olds' hallmarks were boldness, courage and leadership. A World War II ace and Air Force Cross recipient, he gained widespread fame and respect as the aggressive commander of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing during the Southeast Asia War.

Robin Olds grew up amongst military aviators and aircraft -- his father was a World War I pursuit pilot, an aide to Brig. Gen. Billy Mitchell, and commander of the first B-17 squadron. Robin Olds attended West Point, where his characteristic boldness allowed him to excel on the football field -- in 1942, he was selected as an All-American tackle. After Olds graduated in 1943, he attended flight training and went to Europe as a P-38 pilot.

Olds stood out as a daring pilot and a natural leader. Within a few months, he shot down five enemy fighters to become the 479th Fighter Group's first ace. At the very young age of 22, he was promoted to major and given command of the 434th Fighter Squadron. Olds continued his success after the unit converted to P-51s, and he ended the war with 12 victories.

Following World War II, Olds flew in the first P-80 jet demonstration team, followed by command of several operational units, and then staff jobs. Unable to get a combat posting during the Korean War, Olds became determined to get into combat when the Southeast Asia War escalated.

In the fall of 1966, Olds took command of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing (TFW) at Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base. Olds' charisma and courage endeared him to his people, and under his leadership, the "Wolfpack" became the USAF's top MiG-killing wing in Southeast Asia. Olds also played a key role in the creation of the Red River Valley Fighter Pilots Association, which improved coordination between USAF wings in Southeast Asia and became a lasting fraternal organization.

Olds led from the front -- he shared the same risks as his aircrews by flying on the most dangerous missions. He received many decorations for his audacity in combat, including the Air Force Cross for a mission in August 1967, when he led a strike force against the heavily-defended Paul Doumer Bridge in North Vietnam.

The crowning achievement for Olds was planning and leading OPERATION BOLO, when North Vietnamese MiG-21 pilots were tricked into an air battle at a disadvantage. Olds shot down a MiG-21, and his 8th TFW F-4 aircrews shot down six others with no losses. He also shot down three other MiGs during his tour. When added to his WWII victories, his lifetime victory totaled 16 enemy aircraft.

Olds returned from Southeast Asia in December 1967. Promoted to brigadier general in 1968, he became the commandant of cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy, and he retired from active duty in 1973.

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