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Home > Museum News > Learjet C-21A arrives at National Museum of the U.S. Air Force
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 C-21 joined museum collection on Aug. 28
 Aircraft will be displayed in Air Park this fall
 
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Learjet C-21A
DAYTON, Ohio -- One of the U.S. Air Force’s first Learjet C-21A aircraft landed at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Aug. 28, 2013. (U.S. Air Force photo by Don Popp)
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 Learjet C-21A
Learjet C-21A arrives at National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

Posted 8/28/2013   Updated 8/28/2013 Email story   Print story

    


by Sarah Swan
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force


8/28/2013 - DAYTON, Ohio -- One of the U.S. Air Force's first C-21A aircraft landed at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Wednesday, Aug. 28.

The Learjet (now Bombardier Aerospace) C-21A twin turbofan-engine aircraft was the military version of the Learjet 35A business jet. It provided airlift for eight passengers and more than 3,000 pounds of cargo, and it could transport one litter patient or five ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations. The small size of the aircraft allowed quick and cost effective travel.

"The addition of the C-21 gives us the opportunity to better interpret the diversity of the Air Force's airlift mission," said Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Jack Hudson, museum director. "The popular airlift image is heavy-lift large cargo aircraft, like the C-5 or C-17, but the C-21 represents the other end of the mission spectrum. We're excited to see this C-21 starting a new career at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force."

This C-21A (S/N 84-0064) was one of the first three of more than 80 aircraft delivered to the Air Force. It deployed to Southwest Asia in support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. During Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, C-21s delivered the Air Tasking Orders to units lacking the ability to receive these daily orders electronically. This aircraft was last assigned operationally to the North Dakota Air National Guard.

Col. Kent Olson, commander of the 119th Wing, North Dakota Air National Guard, piloted the aircraft during its final flight. Col. Brad Derrig, vice commander of the 119th Wing, was the co-pilot, and Lt. Col. Jerrad Krapp, commander of the 177th Airlift Squadron, also was on board. It was a bittersweet moment for the crew, as it was the last manned flight for the North Dakota Air National Guard, nicknamed the "Happy Hooligans."

According to Olson, during more than 66 years of flying missions, the Happy Hooligans have earned awards and distinctions that set it above all other Air National Guard units. It's an honor to have this aircraft, and their part of its legacy, on display at the museum.

"It's only appropriate that the last C-21 flight from our base will be a first for the National Museum of the Air Force as it expands its collection to include this airframe," Olson said. "Since beginning our C-21 mission in 2007, our maintainers have kept the aircraft in the best condition imaginable as our pilots logged more Joint Operational Support Airlift Center missions and flying hours with it than other units around the country."

The aircraft will be initially displayed at the end of the museum's Southeast Asia War Gallery this fall. More information about the aircraft is available at www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=20966.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force is located on Springfield Street, six miles northeast of downtown Dayton. It is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day). Admission and parking are free. For more information about the museum, visit www.nationalmuseum.af.mil.


NOTE TO PUBLIC: For more information, please contact the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at (937) 255-3286.

NOTE TO MEDIA: For more information, please contact Sarah Swan at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Public Affairs Division at (937) 255-1283.



tabComments
8/30/2013 8:22:18 AM ET
Lt. Col. Stambaugh, the unit is transitioning to the Predator unmanned aerial vehicle.
Public Affairs Division, National Museum of the U.S. Air Force
 
8/29/2013 6:39:44 PM ET
The narrative said last manned flight for the North Dakota Air Guard. Are they going out of business as a manned flight organization or does this mean only the C 21
Lt Colonel T Stambaugh, Tampa Florida
 
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