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Office of Special Investigations exhibit opens at National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

4/20/05 - DAYTON, Ohio -- A new exhibit featuring the Air Force Office of Special Investigations opens at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jeff Fisher)

4/20/05 - DAYTON, Ohio -- A new exhibit featuring the Air Force Office of Special Investigations opens at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Jeff Fisher)

DAYTON, Ohio -- An exhibit highlighting the U.S. Air Force's criminal investigative service is open to the public at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.

"Eyes of the Eagle: The Air Force Office of Special Investigations" exhibit joins the museum's permanent displays in the Cold War Gallery.

The exhibit officially opened April 20 when Air Force Materiel Command Commander Gen. Gregory Martin, OSI Commander Brig. Gen. Eric Patterson, Museum Director Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Charles Metcalf, current and former OSI agents, and other special guests participated in a ceremony to unveil the display.

Founded in 1948, the OSI has played an important role in protecting the Air Force and the nation as it confronts a variety of issues, from murder, burglary and theft to electronic assaults on defense computer systems. OSI employs a wide range of highly trained specialists, including forensic scientists, computer experts, behavioral specialists and other analysts to combat these threats.

"OSI has a proud heritage of accomplishment that spans the globe, encompassing generations and entire eras," said General Patterson. "One of the most significant of those eras, in terms of time and what was at stake, is the Cold War. OSI was on the front lines of this prolonged engagement, and this exhibit does a good job of capturing the essence of that experience and the contribution made to national security."

The exhibit highlights notable OSI tasks, especially those during the Cold War era, which included counterintelligence, responding to espionage and investigating terrorist attacks. Several items used by the OSI are featured in the display, including a disguise kit, surveillance cameras, electronic listening devices, and a wristwatch that was modified to act as a radio transmitter.

Admission to the museum and the exhibit is free.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force is located on Springfield Pike, six miles northeast of downtown Dayton. It is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day).


NOTE TO MEDIA: For more information, contact the National Museum of the United States Air Force Public Affairs Division at (937) 255-4704, ext. 333.

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