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Beech C-45H Expeditor

DAYTON, Ohio -- Beech C-45H Expeditor at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Beech C-45H Expeditor at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Beech C-45H Expeditor at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Beech C-45H Expeditor at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This aircraft is currently in storage.

The C-45 was the World War II military version of the popular Beechcraft Model 18 commercial light transport. Beech built a total of 4,526 of these aircraft for the Army Air Forces between 1939 and 1945 in four versions, the AT-7 Navigator navigation trainer, the AT-11 Kansan bombing-gunnery trainer, the C-45 Expeditor utility transport and the F-2 for aerial photography and mapping. The AT-7 and AT-11 versions were well-known to WWII navigators and bombardiers, for most of these men received their training in these aircraft. Thousands of AAF pilot cadets also were given advanced training in twin-engine Beech airplanes.

During the early 1950s, Beech completely rebuilt 900 C-45s for the Air Force. They received new serial numbers and were designated C-45Gs and C-45Hs, remaining in service until 1963 for administrative and light cargo duties.

The aircraft on display is one of 432 rebuilt as C-45Hs. It was transferred to the museum from the Federal Reformatory at Chillicothe, Ohio, in 1966.

SPECIFICATIONS:
Span: 47 ft. 8 in.
Length: 34 ft. 2 in.
Height: 9 ft. 2 in.
Weight: 9,300 lbs. maximum
Armament: None
Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney R-985s of 450 hp each
Cost: $57,838
Serial Number: 52-10893

PERFORMANCE:
Maximum speed:
219 mph
Cruising speed: 150 mph
Range: 1,140 miles
Service ceiling: 18,200 ft.

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