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Winning Their Wings: Advanced Flying School

Advance Flying School. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Advance Flying School. (U.S. Air Force photo)

North American AT-6s in line-abreast formation. (U.S. Air Force photo)

North American AT-6s in line-abreast formation. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Formation of Beechcraft AT-10s. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Formation of Beechcraft AT-10s. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Cessna AT-17 was a reliable trainer that was quite easy to fly. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Cessna AT-17 was a reliable trainer that was quite easy to fly. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Curtiss AT-9 was considered the AAF's most difficult and tricky aircraft to fly. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Curtiss AT-9 was considered the AAF's most difficult and tricky aircraft to fly. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Advanced flying school prepared a cadet for the kind of single- or multi-engine airplane he was to fly in combat. Those who went to single-engine school flew AT-6s for the first 70 hours during a nine-week period, learning aerial gunnery and combat maneuvers and increasing their skills in navigation, formation and instrument flying.

Cadets assigned to twin-engine school received the same number of flying hours but did not practice combat aerobatics or gunnery. Using the AT-9, AT-10 or AT-17, they directed their efforts toward mastering the art of flying a multi-engine plane in formation and increasing their ability to fly on instruments at night.

Upon completing advanced flying school, the cadet received his wings and commission.

Click here to return to the AAF Training During WWII Overview.

 

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