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Bell XGAM-63 Rascal

DAYTON, Ohio -- Bell XGAM-63 Rascal at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Bell XGAM-63 Rascal at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Bell XGAM-63 Rascal in the R&D Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Bell XGAM-63 Rascal in the R&D Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move the Bell XGAM-63 Rascal into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Bell XGAM-63 Rascal into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Bell XGAM-63 Rascal into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Bell XGAM-63 Rascal into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Rascal being carried by a DB-47 carrier aircraft. After launch, the missile continued toward its predetermined target controlled by a self-contained guidance system. The Rascal's course could also be changed by its carrier aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Rascal being carried by a DB-47 carrier aircraft. After launch, the missile continued toward its predetermined target controlled by a self-contained guidance system. The Rascal's course could also be changed by its carrier aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo)


The Rascal was an air-to-surface, supersonic guided missile tested in the 1950s. It was a “stand-off” nuclear weapon to be launched from Strategic Air Command (SAC) bombers up to 100 miles away from the target.

The first launch of a guided Rascal took place in October 1953 from a Boeing DB-47 carrier aircraft, and in tests it performed with mixed success. In 1958, shortly before the first Rascal unit was to become operational, the U.S. Air Force canceled the program in favor of the more reliable and longer-range Hound Dog missile.

The Bell Aircraft Corp. delivered this prototype Rascal to the museum in 1958.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Armament:
Nuclear warhead
Engine: Bell XLR-67 three-chamber liquid fuel rocket engine of 10,440 lbs. thrust
Maximum speed: About 1,950 mph
Maximum range: 100 miles
Maximum altitude: 65,000 feet
Weight: 18,200 lbs. maximum at launch

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Related Fact Sheets
Strategic Air Command
North American AGM-28B Hound Dog
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