Featured Links


Plan Your Visit
E-newsletter Sign-up
Explore Museum Exhibits
Browse Photos
Visit Press Room
Become a Volunteer
Air Force Museum Foundation

Convair B-58A Hustler

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

(U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Photo courtesy of John Rossino, Lockheed Martin Code One)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Photo courtesy of John Rossino, Lockheed Martin Code One)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58 Hustler cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58A Hustler pilot cockpit view in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.(Photo courtesy of Lyle Jansma, Aerocapture Images)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58A Hustler pilot cockpit view in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.(Photo courtesy of Lyle Jansma, Aerocapture Images)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58A Hustler defensive system operator station view in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.(Photo courtesy of Lyle Jansma, Aerocapture Images)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58A Hustler defensive system operator station view in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.(Photo courtesy of Lyle Jansma, Aerocapture Images)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58A Hustler navigator station view in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.(Photo courtesy of Lyle Jansma, Aerocapture Images)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 10

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair B-58A Hustler navigator station view in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force.(Photo courtesy of Lyle Jansma, Aerocapture Images)


The U.S. Air Force's first operational supersonic bomber, the B-58 made its initial flight on Nov. 11, 1956. In addition to the Hustler's delta wing shape, distinctive features included a sophisticated inertial guidance navigation and bombing system, a slender "wasp-waist" fuselage and an extensive use of heat-resistant honeycomb sandwich skin panels in the wings and fuselage. Since the thin fuselage prevented the carrying of bombs internally, a droppable, two-component pod beneath the fuselage contained a nuclear weapon -- along with extra fuel, reconnaissance equipment or other specialized gear. The B-58 crew consisted of a pilot, navigator/bombardier and defense systems operator.

Convair built 116 B-58s: 30 test and pre-production aircraft and 86 for operational service. Hustlers flew in the Strategic Air Command between 1960 and 1970. Setting 19 world speed and altitude records, B-58s also won five different aviation trophies.

The B-58A on display set three speed records while flying from Los Angeles to New York and back on March 5, 1962. For this effort, the crew received the Bendix and Mackay Trophies for 1962. It was flown to the museum in December 1969.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Armament: One 20mm cannon in tail; nuclear weapons in pod or on under-wing pylons
Engines: Four General Electric J79s of 15,000 lbs. thrust each (with afterburner)
Maximum speed: 1,325 mph
Range: 4,400 miles without aerial refueling
Ceiling: 64,800 ft.
Span: 56 ft. 10 in.
Length: 96 ft. 10 in.
Height: 31 ft. 5 in.
Weight: 163,000 lbs. maximum

Click here to return to the Cold War Gallery.

 

Find Out More
Line
Related Fact Sheets
B-58A Escape Capsule
General Electric J79 Turbojet Engine
Line
360-degree Virtual Tour
View the B-58A on Display
Line
Cockpit360 Images
View the B-58A Pilot Station
View the B-58A Navigator Station
View the B-58A Defensive System Operator Station
Line
Note: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the National Museum of the USAF, the U.S. Air Force, or the Department of Defense, of the external website, or the information, products or services contained therein.