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Museum rolls first aircraft into new fourth building

Retired NASA astronaut and the only surviving X-15 pilot, Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Joe Engle sat in the X-15 cockpit one more time. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Retired NASA astronaut and the only surviving X-15 pilot, Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Joe Engle sat in the X-15 cockpit one more time. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Retired NASA astronaut and the only surviving X-15 pilot, Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Joe Engle poses in front of the museum’s X-15A-2. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building when it was moved from the restoration hangar on Oct. 2, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Retired NASA astronaut and the only surviving X-15 pilot, Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Joe Engle poses in front of the museum’s X-15A-2. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building when it was moved from the restoration hangar on Oct. 2, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Museum restoration crews move the X-15A-2 from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Museum restoration crews move the X-15A-2 from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

The North American X-15A-2 was moved from the restoration hangar to the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2, 2015. The X-15 became the first aircraft to be moved into the fourth building, where it will be part of the expanded Space Gallery. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio --

Restoration crews at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force moved the North American X-15A-2 into the museum’s new fourth building on Oct. 2. The X-15, which will be displayed in the expanded Space Gallery, is the first of many aircraft to move into the building.

 

The 224,000 square foot fourth building, which is scheduled to open to the public in June 2016, will house four galleries – Research and Development, Space, Global Reach and Presidential, along with three science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) Learning Nodes.

 

The public will be able to view aircraft as they move into the fourth building from a designated area on the museum grounds. Information on the move schedule will be updated regularly on the museum’s website (http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Expansion.aspx). A map of the viewing area and additional information about the expansion also are available on that page.

 

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, is the world’s largest military aviation museum. With free admission and parking, the museum features more than 360 aerospace vehicles and missiles and thousands of artifacts amid more than 17 acres of indoor exhibit space. Each year about one million visitors from around the world come to the museum. For more information, visit www.nationalmuseum.af.mil.


 

NOTE TO PUBLIC: For more information, please contact the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at (937) 255-3286.

 

NOTE TO MEDIA: For more information, please contact Sarah Swan at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force Public Affairs Division at (937) 255-1283.

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