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94th Aero Squadron

Having completed gunnery school, Rickenbacker was assigned to the 94th Aero Squadron. In late February, he and several other pilots traveled to Paris to fly their new Nieuport 28s back to Villeneuve. However, a snow storm delayed their return, and Rickenbacker used some of the extra time to begin a diary. His first entry on Saturday, March 2, 1917, marks the beginning of an account that would continue past the Armistice, providing a first-hand account from the man who would become America's "Ace of Aces."

Having completed gunnery school, Rickenbacker was assigned to the 94th Aero Squadron. In late February, he and several other pilots traveled to Paris to fly their new Nieuport 28s back to Villeneuve. However, a snow storm delayed their return, and Rickenbacker used some of the extra time to begin a diary. His first entry on Saturday, March 2, 1917, marks the beginning of an account that would continue past the Armistice, providing a first-hand account from the man who would become America's "Ace of Aces."

Note: This photo is currently in storage

 

Having completed gunnery school, Rickenbacker was assigned to the 94th Aero Squadron. In late February, he and several

other pilots traveled to Paris to fly their new Nieuport 28s back to Villeneuve. However, a snow storm delayed their return,

and Rickenbacker used some of the extra time to begin a diary. His first entry on Saturday, March 2, 1917, marks the

beginning of an account that would continue past the Armistice, providing a first-hand account from the man who 

would become America's "Ace of Aces."

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