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VB-9 Guided Bomb

DAYTON, Ohio - The VB-9 Guided Bomb on display in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio - The VB-9 Guided Bomb on display in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

The VB-9, one of the first of the "ROC" series of medium angle guided bombs, used a 1,000-pound general purpose bomb. The ROC nickname was derived from a giant mythological bird in tales from the Arabian Nights.

The VB-9 was designed with four symmetrically arranged wings and a finned tail. It carried a radar homing device in the nose which relayed an image of the target area to the bombardier, who then directed the bomb's course by radio as it fell. In other models of the ROC series, the original wing design was replaced by a more compact circular airfoil and other forms of homing devices were planned including heat-seeking and light-seeking systems. The VB-9 project ended in early 1945. 

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