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Convair XF-92A

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair XF-92A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair XF-92A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair XF-92A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair XF-92A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair XF-92A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Convair XF-92A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move the Convair XF-92A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 7, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Convair XF-92A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 7, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Convair XF-92A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 7, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Convair XF-92A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 7, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Northrop X-4 Bantam aircraft into position within the R&D Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in November 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move the Northrop X-4 Bantam aircraft into position within the R&D Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in November 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move R&D aircraft into position within the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in November 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move R&D aircraft into position within the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in November 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Convair XF-92A in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Convair XF-92A in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Convair XF-92A. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Convair XF-92A. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Early illustration of the ramjet-powered XP-92 (In 1948, the Air Force changed the designation from “P” for pursuit to “F” for fighter). (U.S. Air Force photo)
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Early illustration of the ramjet-powered XP-92 (In 1948, the Air Force changed the designation from “P” for pursuit to “F” for fighter). (U.S. Air Force photo)

The XF-92’s triangular wing is called a delta wing because it resembles the Greek letter delta (Δ). Several later aircraft designs, including the USAF’s F-102, F-106 and B-58, have delta wings. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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The XF-92’s triangular wing is called a delta wing because it resembles the Greek letter delta (Δ). Several later aircraft designs, including the USAF’s F-102, F-106 and B-58, have delta wings. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The XF-92A was the world's first jet aircraft to fly with the radical delta-wing configuration pioneered by Germany's Dr. Alexander Lippisch. Convair used the knowledge learned from the XF-92 to design the delta-wing F-102, the U.S. Air Force’s first operational supersonic interceptor. 

The original 1945 F-92 design concept was a short-ranged, swept-wing, supersonic interceptor powered by a ramjet and several rocket engines. In the end, this propulsion system proved impractical, and the USAF canceled the F-92 interceptor program.

The USAF, however, accepted the turbojet-powered XF-92A prototype to conduct delta-wing flight research. The sole XF-92A was flown by Air Force and NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics), predecessor to NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), test pilots from 1948 until its nose gear collapsed on landing in October 1953.

The museum’s aircraft was delivered in 1969 from the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. 

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Engine:
Allison J33 turbojet of 8,600 lbs. thrust with afterburner
Maximum speed: 715 mph
Service ceiling: 40,000 feet
Weight: 8,500 empty; 14,608 lbs. maximum

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Related Fact Sheets
Convair F-102A Delta Dagger
Allison J33 Turbojet Engine
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