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Lockheed P-80R

DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed P-80R at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed P-80R at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed P-80R at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed P-80R at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move the Lockheed P-80R into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Lockheed P-80R into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Lockheed P-80R into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Restoration staff move the Lockheed P-80R into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Oct. 8, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Lockheed P-80R in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Lockheed P-80R in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on December 28, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo)

General view of the Research and Development Gallery in the museum's fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

General view of the Research and Development Gallery in the museum's fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Col. Albert Boyd in front of the P-80R. On June 19, 1947, at Muroc Army Air Field (now Edwards Air Force Base), California, Boyd flew this P-80R to a new world's speed record of 623.753 mph, returning the record to the United States after nearly 24 years. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Col. Albert Boyd in front of the P-80R. On June 19, 1947, at Muroc Army Air Field (now Edwards Air Force Base), California, Boyd flew this P-80R to a new world's speed record of 623.753 mph, returning the record to the United States after nearly 24 years. (U.S. Air Force photo)

P-80R flying past a speed marking station at Muroc Army Air Field. On June 19, 1947, at Muroc Army Air Field (now Edwards Air Force Base), Calif., Col. Albert Boyd flew this P-80R to a new world's speed record of 623.753 mph, returning the record to the United States after nearly 24 years. (U.S. Air Force photo)

P-80R flying past a speed marking station at Muroc Army Air Field. On June 19, 1947, at Muroc Army Air Field (now Edwards Air Force Base), Calif., Col. Albert Boyd flew this P-80R to a new world's speed record of 623.753 mph, returning the record to the United States after nearly 24 years. (U.S. Air Force photo)

On June 19, 1947, at Muroc Army Air Field (now Edwards Air Force Base), Calif., Col. Albert Boyd flew this P-80R to a new world's speed record of 623.753 mph, returning the record to the United States after nearly 24 years.

The Army Air Force's quest to capture the world's speed record -- then held by a British Gloster Meteor -- after World War II led to the creation of the specialized P-80R. A high-speed variant of the standard P-80A Shooting Star, it had a smaller canopy, redesigned air intakes and a shorter wing with an extended leading edge. In addition, the engine was modified, armament removed and replaced by a fuel tank, and all drag-producing openings sealed.

The P-80R on display is the only one built. It was shipped to the museum from Griffiss Air Force Base, New York, in October 1954.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Engine: Modified Allison J33-A-21 of 5,079 lbs. thrust (with alcohol-water injection)
Maximum speed: 623.753 mph
Range: 1,045 miles
Service ceiling: 45,000 feet
Weight: 12,054 lbs. maximum

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