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Radioplane OQ-14

DAYTON, Ohio -- Radioplane OQ-14 in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Radioplane OQ-14 in the Research & Development Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This aircraft is currently located in the Research & Development Gallery, which is scheduled to close Oct. 1, 2015, to prepare for the move to the fourth building. At that time, this aircraft will be placed in storage.

Beginning in the 1930s, the United States had used radio-controlled model airplanes as aerial targets for antiaircraft gunnery training. Starting in 1935, the Radioplane Co. in California developed several variations of an original design by former movie star and modeler Reginald Denny. Powered by a 20-hp Righter engine to a top speed of 140 mph, the Radioplane OQ-14 served as an aerial target in the years after World War II. Launched from a catapult, it landed by parachute. By 1954, improved models had superseded the OQ-14, making it obsolete.

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