HomeVisitMuseum ExhibitsFact SheetsDisplay

Pratt & Whitney J57 Turbojet

DAYTON, Ohio -- Pratt & Whitney J57 Turbojet engine on display in the Presidential Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Pratt & Whitney J57 Turbojet engine on display in the Presidential Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The J57 turbojet was the first production jet engine to produce 10,000 pounds of thrust. The J57 featured a dual-rotor axial-flow compressor, which lowered fuel consumption over a wide operating range and improved the sluggish acceleration characteristic of previous jet engines.

J57 production began in 1953. The same year, Pratt & Whitney was awarded America's highest aviation honor, the Collier Trophy, for the design and development of the J57. When production ended in 1970, Pratt & Whitney had built more than 21,000 engines.

The cut-away engine on display is a YJ57-P-3, the first version to go into production. Rated at only 8,700 pounds of thrust, it served as a prototype for higher-powered engines used in operational B-52s. Later versions of the J57 and its commercial equivalent, the JT3, were improved to reach 18,000 pounds of thrust with afterburner. In addition to the B-52, the J57 powered numerous USAF aircraft, including the KC-135, F-100, F-101, and F-102.


Click here to return to the Cold War Gallery.

Find Out More
Line
Related Fact Sheets
Convair F-102A Delta Dagger
Line
Note: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the National Museum of the USAF, the U.S. Air Force, or the Department of Defense, of the external website, or the information, products or services contained therein.


Mask Policy:
In accordance with the updated guidance released by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Department of Defense (DoD) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will require all visitors to wear face masks indoors effective July 30, 2021 until further notice.

Visitors ages three and up will be required to wear masks while indoors at the museum. This policy applies to all visitors, staff and volunteers regardless of vaccination status. Visitors may wear their own masks or a free paper mask will be provided. Cloth masks will also be available for purchase in the Museum Store.
Additional information available here.

Featured Links

Plan Your Visit button
E-newsletter Sign-up button
Explore Museum Exhibits button
Browse Photos button
Visit Press Room button
Become a Volunteer button
Air Force Museum Foundation button
Donate an item button