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Airman 1st Class William H. Pitsenbarger

DAYTON, Ohio - Part of Airman 1st Class William H. Pitsenbarger's uniform on display in the Southeast Asia War Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio - Part of Airman 1st Class William H. Pitsenbarger's uniform on display in the Southeast Asia War Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger preparing for a water jump. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger preparing for a water jump. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger in scuba gear. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger in scuba gear. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger with an M-16 outside the HH-43. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger with an M-16 outside the HH-43. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A1C William Pitsenbarger. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio - Airmen 1st Class William H. Pitsenbarger's military decorations on display in the Southeast Asia War Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio - Airmen 1st Class William H. Pitsenbarger's military decorations on display in the Southeast Asia War Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio - Pitsenbarger's uniform patches and badges, including pararescue insignia, parachute badges, and enlisted aircrew wings. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio - Pitsenbarger's uniform patches and badges, including pararescue insignia, parachute badges, and enlisted aircrew wings. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio - William H. Pitsenbarger's personal effects sent to his parents following his death. These items are on display in the Southeast Asia War Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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DAYTON, Ohio - William H. Pitsenbarger's personal effects sent to his parents following his death. These items are on display in the Southeast Asia War Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Born in 1944 in Piqua, Ohio, William H. Pitsenbarger was an ambitious only child. He wanted to quit high school to join the U.S. Army Special Forces' "Green Berets," but his parents convinced him to stay in school. After graduating in 1962, Pitsenbarger joined the Air Force.

A1C Pitsenbarger learned his military skills in a series of demanding schools. After Air Force basic training, he volunteered for pararescue work and embarked on a rigorous training program, which included U.S. Army parachute school, survival school, a rescue and survival medical course, and the U.S. Navy's scuba diving school. More Air Force rescue training and jungle survival school followed. His final training was in air crash rescue and firefighting, with assignment to the HH-43 Huskie helicopter.

Arriving in Vietnam in August 1965, Pitsenbarger completed more than 250 missions, including one in which he hung from an HH-43's cable to rescue a wounded South Vietnamese soldier from a burning minefield. This action earned him the Airman's Medal and the Republic of Vietnam's Medal of Military Merit and Gallantry Cross with Bronze Palm.

William H. Pitsenbarger was only 21 years old when he was killed in action. But in his short life and valorous Air Force career, he was an example of dedication, compassion and tenacity for all those with whom he served. In his work, and especially on his final mission, Airman 1st Class Pitsenbarger embodied the pararescueman's motto: "That Others May Live."

The Last Mission 
"There was only one man on the ground that day that would have turned down a ride out of that hellhole -- and that man was Pitsenbarger."
- F. David Peters, Charlie Company, 2nd Battalion, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division


In Vietnam Airman 1st Class William H. "Bill" Pitsenbarger gave his life so that others might live. A pararescueman, Pitsenbarger saved lives in an example of selfless heroism worthy of the Medal of Honor.

On April 11, 1966, in thick jungle near Saigon, an infantry company on 134 soldiers from the 1st Infantry Division (the "Big Red One") was surrounded by a Viet Cong battalion of approximately 500 troops. In a fierce firefight, the North Vietnamese surrounded and pinned down the Americans. As the battle went on, the number of U.S. casualties grew steadily.

Detachment 6 of the USAF's 38th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron received an urgent call to evacuate the wounded. Army helicopters could not land in the battle zone because there were no clearings in the tall, dense "triple canopy" forest. The tallest trees rose 150 feet, and a second layer stood at about 100 feet, with a third layer below. Only U.S. Air Force HH-43 Huskie helicopters with cables and winches could hoist the injured from the jungle.

Airman Pitsenbarger was the rescue and survival specialist aboard "Pedro 73," one of the two Huskies on the mission. The Huskies were to take turns hoisting litters with critically wounded patients through the forest canopy and delivering them to a nearby airfield. Pedro 73's crew, while under fire and hovering in a hole in the forest below the tallest trees and barely large enough for the Huskie, saw that the ground troops desperately needed help loading wounded into the litter. Pitsenbarger volunteered to be lowered to the ground to help. He descended a hundred feet into the firefight with a medical bag, a supply of splints, a rifle and a pistol.

On the ground, Pitsenbarger organized and speeded the evacuation, enabling the Huskies to rescue nine soldiers on several trips. Normally, pararescuemen return to the helicopter, but Pitsenbarger chose to stay and help the beleaguered troops. As the fight continued, Pedro 73 was badly damaged by ground fire and forced to withdraw. Rather than escape with the last Huskie, Pitsenbarger chose to stay on the ground and aid the wounded. Soon the firefight grew too intense for the helicopters to return.

As darkness fell, Pitsenbarger not only cared for the wounded, but also collected and distributed ammunition to the surviving soldiers several times under enemy fire. In the early evening he was mortally wounded fighting alongside the remaining infantrymen. The Viet Cong withdrew during the night, and the following morning U.S. forces were able to recover survivors and the fallen. Charlie Company had suffered 80 percent casualties.

For coordinating the successful rescues, caring for the wounded and sacrificing his life while aggressively defending his comrades, William H. Pitsenbarger received the Air Force Cross on June 30, 1966. After review, the original award was upgraded, and on Dec. 8, 2000, the Medal of Honor was presented to his family in a ceremony at the U.S. Air Force Museum. Airman Pitsenbarger is the 59th Medal of Honor recipient, and sixth enlisted recipient, from the Air Force and its predecessor organizations.

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