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Return with Honor: American Prisoners of War in Southeast Asia

DAYTON, Ohio -- "Return with Honor: American Prisoners of War in Southeast Asia" exhibit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- "Return with Honor: American Prisoners of War in Southeast Asia" exhibit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

USAF Capt. Edwin Atterberry, captured Aug. 12, 1967. He was beaten to death in captivity for trying to escape. (U.S. Air Force)

USAF Capt. Edwin Atterberry, captured Aug. 12, 1967. He was beaten to death in captivity for trying to escape. (U.S. Air Force)

Air Force Col. James L. Hughes was captured in May 1967, and spent nearly six years as a POW. Years after his release, he said “It's a miracle I'm still alive. My captors told me the only reason they didn't kill me was because I was a useful bargaining tool.” (U.S. Air Force photo)

Air Force Col. James L. Hughes was captured in May 1967, and spent nearly six years as a POW. Years after his release, he said “It's a miracle I'm still alive. My captors told me the only reason they didn't kill me was because I was a useful bargaining tool.” (U.S. Air Force photo)

American prisoners of war (POWs) in Southeast Asia endured inhuman torture, political exploitation, filthy living conditions and endless attempts at communist indoctrination. North Vietnam treated U.S. servicemen not as POWs but as foreign invaders and criminals bent on subverting Vietnam's communist revolution. Most POWs were held in camps in North Vietnam, but some were imprisoned in South Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and even in China. POWs' families at home could not be sure if prisoners were alive or dead, and the question of POW treatment became a major public issue during the war.

Click on the following links to learn more about the Return with Honor: American Prisoners of War in Southeast Asia exhibit at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

Brutality and Endurance
The "Hanoi Hilton" and Other Prisons
Inner Strength
Unbroken Will: The Lance Sijan Story
Family Odysseys: Working At Home For POW-MIAs
Operation Homecoming
Home at Last: MIAs Since the End of the War

Click here to return to the Coming Home Overview.

 

Find Out More
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Lectures
Maj. Gen. (Ret.) John Borling: "Return and Renewal with Honor" (00:41:40)
Dr. Doug Lantry: "Return with Honor" (00:38:20)
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Note: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the National Museum of the USAF, the U.S. Air Force, or the Department of Defense, of the external website, or the information, products or services contained therein.

Please note Springfield Street, the road that leads to the museum’s entrance, is undergoing construction through the beginning of September. Expect lane reductions and some delays. Please follow the signs and instructions provided by the road crews.

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