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Allison J33 Turbojet

DAYTON, Ohio -- Allison J33 on display in the Korean War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Allison J33 on display in the Korean War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Originally developed by the General Electric Co. for the Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star, the J33 engine is a direct descendant of the British Whittle engine of the early 1940s. The first J33 underwent static testing on Jan. 13, 1944, just 6 1/2 months after development began. Five months later, a J33 engine flew in the XP-80A replacing the De Havilland H-1A, a change that was to become permanent. In November 1945 the Allison Division of General Motors assumed complete responsibility for the development and production of J33 series engines. The J33s were used in various models of USAF and Navy aircraft, and in the USAF's Mace, Matador and Snark surface-to-surface guided missiles.

The engine on display, a J33-A-35, is of the series used exclusively on the F-80C fighter, T-33A trainer and the Navy TV-2 trainer. Between 1949 and 1955, Allison produced more than 6,600 J33-A-35s for the USAF, more than any other J33 series engine.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Compressor:
Single-stage centrifugal
Turbine: Single axial
Weight: 1,795 lbs.
Cost: $20,000
Thrust: 4,600 lbs. (5,400 lbs. with water/alcohol injection)
Maximum rpm: 11,750
Maximum operating altitude: 47,000 ft.

Click here to return to the Korean War Gallery.


Mask Policy:
In accordance with the updated guidance released by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Department of Defense (DoD) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will require all visitors to wear face masks indoors effective July 30, 2021 until further notice.

Visitors ages three and up will be required to wear masks while indoors at the museum. This policy applies to all visitors, staff and volunteers regardless of vaccination status. Visitors may wear their own masks or a free paper mask will be provided. Cloth masks will also be available for purchase in the Museum Store.
Additional information available here.

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