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K-24 Camera

DAYTON, Ohio -- K-24 camera in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- K-24 camera in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note:  This item has temporarily been removed from display.

The K-24 camera, developed in 1942, is a modification of the British F-24 camera. The K-24 camera is 10 pounds lighter than its British counterpart. More than 9,000 K-24 cameras were made for use in tactical reconnaissance aircraft in World War II, including the Supermarine Spitfire, the North American F-6 (modified P-51), and the Canadian-built De Havilland F-8 (modified Mosquito). The K-24 camera had two basic functions: night aerial reconnaissance and orientation, or verifying a bomber's position over a target when a bomb is released.

This camera was manufactured by Eastman Kodak Co.

Click here to return to the World War II Gallery.

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