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Maj. Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band

DAYTON, Ohio -- Maj. Glenn Miller exhibit in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Maj. Glenn Miller exhibit in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller's summer uniform cap and spare eyeglasses on display in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller's summer uniform cap and spare eyeglasses on display in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Eisenhower jacket worn by Tech. Sgt. Ray McKinley while a member of the Maj. Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band, including the period he was its leader following Maj. Miller's disappearance. The jacket, donated by Ray McKinley of Stamford, Conn., is on display in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Eisenhower jacket worn by Tech. Sgt. Ray McKinley while a member of the Maj. Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band, including the period he was its leader following Maj. Miller's disappearance. The jacket, donated by Ray McKinley of Stamford, Conn., is on display in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Poster advertising the appearance of the Maj. Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band at the famous Paris Opera House on Feb. 18, 1945. This was the first time in history that "popular-style" music had ever been played in the Opera House. The event raised several million francs for French Prisoners of War Relief. The poster is on display in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Poster advertising the appearance of the Maj. Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band at the famous Paris Opera House on Feb. 18, 1945. This was the first time in history that "popular-style" music had ever been played in the Opera House. The event raised several million francs for French Prisoners of War Relief. The poster is on display in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller conducts the band during an open air concert. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller conducts the band during an open air concert. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller standing with hand in pocket. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller standing with hand in pocket. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Another photograph of Maj. Glenn Miller and his band taken by the soldier in the audience. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Another photograph of Maj. Glenn Miller and his band taken by the soldier in the audience. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A soldier in the audience takes a photograph of Maj. Glenn Miller as band leader. (U.S. Air Force photo)

A soldier in the audience takes a photograph of Maj. Glenn Miller as band leader. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller in conversation. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller in conversation. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Maj. Glenn Miller greets some soldiers. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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Maj. Glenn Miller greets some soldiers. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band performs at the Yale Bowl at Yale University in 1943. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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The Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band performs at the Yale Bowl at Yale University in 1943. (U.S. Air Force photo)

On Aug. 3, 1944, during a USO tour in England, Dinah Shore made several advance broadcasts with Glenn Miller's band. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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On Aug. 3, 1944, during a USO tour in England, Dinah Shore made several advance broadcasts with Glenn Miller's band. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Bing Crosby (left) made several broadcasts with the Army Air Force Band in August 1944. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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Bing Crosby (left) made several broadcasts with the Army Air Force Band in August 1944. (U.S. Air Force photo)

In September 1942, Glenn Miller, one of America's greatest dance band leaders of the period, disbanded his orchestra so he could join the Army Air Forces to do his part for the war effort. Within a year, he organized and perfected what has been widely accepted as the greatest aggregation of dance musicians ever forged into a single unit, the Maj. Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band.

The band was transferred from the United States to England in June 1944 and immediately began playing in theaters, clubs, hospitals, hangars and even out in the open -- anywhere that U.S. servicemen could gather. In the 15 months the unit served in Europe, it made more than 350 personal appearances, attended by 1,250,000 military personnel. In addition, it made more than 500 radio broadcasts for the pleasure of millions of other soldiers. It brought "a little bit of home" to the lonely serviceman in foreign lands and was enjoyed by our Allies as well.

Click here to return to the World War II Gallery.

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