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Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling

Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. The AT-9 advanced trainer was used to bridge the gap between single-engine trainers and twin-engine combat aircraft. (Courtesy photo by Don Popp)

Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. The AT-9 advanced trainer was used to bridge the gap between single-engine trainers and twin-engine combat aircraft. (Courtesy photo by Don Popp)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the WWII Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)
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DAYTON, Ohio -- Curtiss AT-9 Jeep/Fledgling in the World War II Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

 

 

The AT-9 advanced trainer was used to bridge the gap between single-engine trainers and twin-engine combat aircraft. The prototype first flew in 1941, and the production version entered service in 1942. The prototype had a fabric-covered steel tube fuselage and fabric-covered wings, but production AT-9s were of stressed metal skin construction. The AT-9 was not easy to fly or land, making it particularly suitable for teaching new pilots to cope with the demanding flight characteristics of a new generation of high-performance, multi-engine aircraft such as the Martin B-26 and Lockheed P-38. Although the AT-9 originally bore the nickname "Fledgling," it was more widely known as the "Jeep." Four hundred ninety-one AT-9s and 300 AT-9As were built before production ended in February 1943.

The aircraft on display was not complete when the museum acquired it. Some of the parts used to restore it were taken from another incomplete AT-9, while other parts had to be built from "scratch" by museum restoration specialists.

TECHNICAL NOTES: 
Armament:
None
Engines: Two Lycoming R-680-9s of 295 hp ea.
Maximum speed: 197 mph
Cruising speed: 173 mph
Range: 750 miles
Ceiling: 19,000 ft.
Span: 40 ft. 4 in.
Length: 31 ft. 8 in.
Height: 9 ft. 10 in.
Weight: 6,062 lbs. loaded
Serial number: 41-12150


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