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Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25

DAYTON, Ohio (11/2006) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo by Timothy R. Gaffney)

DAYTON, Ohio (11/2006) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo by Timothy R. Gaffney)

DAYTON, Ohio -- MiG 25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- MiG 25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio (02/2007) -- Wide shot of the MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

DAYTON, Ohio (02/2007) -- Wide shot of the MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

DAYTON, Ohio (02/2007) -- MiG 25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

DAYTON, Ohio (02/2007) -- MiG 25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

DAYTON, Ohio (07/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo courtesy of Craig Scaling, Airshow Traveler)

DAYTON, Ohio (07/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo courtesy of Craig Scaling, Airshow Traveler)

DAYTON, Ohio (07/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo courtesy of Craig Scaling, Airshow Traveler)

DAYTON, Ohio (07/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo courtesy of Craig Scaling, Airshow Traveler)

DAYTON, Ohio (07/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo courtesy of Craig Scaling, Airshow Traveler)

DAYTON, Ohio (07/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (Photo courtesy of Craig Scaling, Airshow Traveler)

DAYTON, Ohio (10/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio (10/2007) -- MiG-25 in the restoration area at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This aircraft is currently in the restoration hangar. 

The Soviet MiG-25 (NATO code-name "Foxbat") was a high-speed interceptor and reconnaissance aircraft. The aircraft entered service in 1970 and has a top speed of Mach 2.83, powerful radar, and could carry up to four air-to-air missiles.

The MiG-25's capabilities were not discovered until 1976 when Viktor Belenko, a Soviet MiG-25 pilot, defected to Japan. Subsequent analysis revealed a simple-yet-functional design with vacuum-tube electronics, two massive turbojet engines, and sparing use of advanced materials such as titanium.

A capable interceptor, the MiG-25 was widely exported by the Soviet Union. The first MiG-25s entered service with the Iraqi Air Force in 1980 during the Iran-Iraq War. 

The aircraft on exhibit, a MiG-25RB, was found in 2003 by American forces buried in the sand near Al Taqaddum Airbase 250km west of Baghdad during the opening months of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The MiG-25 was buried to prevent its destruction on the ground by coalition aircraft. The aircraft was recovered incomplete--the wings could not be located and the vertical stabilizers were removed for transport. The aircraft arrived at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in 2006.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Armament:
Four air-to-air missiles (two radar-guided AA-6 "Acrid" missiles, and two infrared-guided R-40T missiles).
Engines: Two Tumansky R-15B-300 turbojets of approx. 22,500 lbs. thrust each with afterburner
Maximum speed: Mach 2.83

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Mask Policy:
In accordance with the updated guidance released by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Department of Defense (DoD) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will require all visitors to wear face masks indoors effective July 30, 2021 until further notice.

Visitors ages three and up will be required to wear masks while indoors at the museum. This policy applies to all visitors, staff and volunteers regardless of vaccination status. Visitors may wear their own masks or a free paper mask will be provided. Cloth masks will also be available for purchase in the Museum Store.
Additional information available here.

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