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Primary Evasion Lines in Western Europe

The three major evasion lines in western Europe were the Pat Line (also known as the O'Leary or P.A.O. Line), the Comet Line, and the Shelburne Line. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The three major evasion lines in western Europe were the Pat Line (also known as the O'Leary or P.A.O. Line), the Comet Line, and the Shelburne Line. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Pat Line, headquartered in Marseilles, was named after one of its commanders, Dr. Albert-Marie Edmond Guérisse (alias Pat O'Leary). Betrayed by a traitor in March 1943, Dr. Guérisse suffered brutal Gestapo torture, but did not reveal any names.  Sent to a concentration camp and sentenced to death, he somehow survived the war. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Pat Line, headquartered in Marseilles, was named after one of its commanders, Dr. Albert-Marie Edmond Guérisse (alias Pat O'Leary). Betrayed by a traitor in March 1943, Dr. Guérisse suffered brutal Gestapo torture, but did not reveal any names. Sent to a concentration camp and sentenced to death, he somehow survived the war. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The three major evasion lines in western Europe were the Pat Line (also known as the O'Leary or P.A.O. Line), the Comet Line and the Shelburne Line.

Click here to return to Winged Boot: Escape and Evasion in World War II.

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