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Japanese Katana Sword

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

This sword belonged to Horace "Sally" Crouch, a navigator/bombardier on crew No. 10 of the Doolittle Raid. The sword was produced in the 1700s by Hoki No Kami Shonidai Nobutaka, as noted on the 1805 list of Wazamono (good sword smiths) of the Shinto Period. It has pre-Kangi calligraphy chiseled into the tang, a standard Japanese army grip and a Tsuba ancestral piece that is designed like two swallows flying in a circle.

Donated by Mr. Jay Wisler.

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