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Wasserfall Surface-to-Air Missile

Wasserfall was a radio-controlled, supersonic guided missile for anti-aircraft purpose. Developed by the Germans during World War II, the Wasserfall was tracked by one installation while another would track the target. Then a computer would connect the data to determine when the warhead should be detonated. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Wasserfall was a radio-controlled, supersonic guided missile for anti-aircraft purpose. Developed by the Germans during World War II, the Wasserfall was tracked by one installation while another would track the target. Then a computer would connect the data to determine when the warhead should be detonated. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

Wasserfall (Waterfall) was a radio-controlled, supersonic guided missile for anti-aircraft purpose. Developed by the Germans during World War II, the Wasserfall was tracked by one installation while another would track the target. Then a computer would connect the data to determine when the warhead should be detonated. The first successful launch took place in February 1944. Research and development of the rocket ended in February 1945.

Transferred from the U.S. Army Center of Military History.

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