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North American F-86H Sabre

North American F-86H Sabre & Boeing KC-97L Stratofreighter

DAYTON, Ohio -- The North American F-86H Sabre and the Boeing KC-97L Stratofreighter on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.(U.S. Air Force photo by Ty Greenlees)

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American F-86H in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American F-86H in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American F-86H on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- North American F-86H on display in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

North American F-86H in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

North American F-86H in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

North American F-86H in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

North American F-86H in the Cold War Gallery at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The F-86H, perfected after the signing of the Korean Armistice, represented the practical application of knowledge gained from the thousands of combat missions flown by the earlier F-86A, E and F variants. Primarily a fighter-bomber, the F-86H was larger and heavier than its predecessors, but it had better all-around performance.


The airplane was produced from late 1953 to August 1955, North American produced more than 450 F-86Hs. Although never used in combat, it provided the U.S. Air Force with a formidable fighter-bomber aircraft until the advent of the supersonic F-100.

The museum obtained the F-86H on display from the New Jersey Air National Guard in November 1964. It is exhibited with part of its stressed skin removed to show the internal structure and placement of equipment.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Armament: Four M-39 20mm cannon or six .50-cal. machine guns; eight 5-in. rockets, 2,000 lbs. of bombs, or nuclear weapon
Engine: General Electric J73-GE-3E of 9,070 lbs. thrust
Maximum speed: 693 mph
Range: 1,050 miles
Span: 39 ft. 1 in.
Length: 38 ft. 10 in.
Height: 14 ft. 11 in.
Weight: 18,683 lbs. loaded
Serial number: 53-1352

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Related Fact Sheets
North American F-100F Super Sabre
General Electric J73 Turbojet Engine
 
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