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Litton Suit

Based on a Litton "constant-volume" concept of the so-called "hard suit" of early 1955, the Mark I Extravehicular and Lunar Surface Suit was tested during the 1958-1959 period for more than 600 hours at simulated altitudes exceeding 100 miles. The unique construction of this suit permitted almost a full range of body motions by the person wearing it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Based on a Litton "constant-volume" concept of the so-called "hard suit" of early 1955, the Mark I Extravehicular and Lunar Surface Suit was tested during the 1958-1959 period for more than 600 hours at simulated altitudes exceeding 100 miles. The unique construction of this suit permitted almost a full range of body motions by the person wearing it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

This USAF Mark I Extravehicular and Lunar Surface Suit, designed and built by Litton Industries, predated both the launch of Sputnik I by the Soviet Union and the creation of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration by the United States. Based on a Litton "constant-volume" concept of the so-called "hard suit" of early 1955, the Mark I was tested during the 1958-1959 period for more than 600 hours at simulated altitudes exceeding 100 miles. The unique construction of this suit permitted almost a full range of body motions by the person wearing it. The great success of the Mark I led to the subsequent development of a more refined and satisfactory RX-series "Moon Suits" for NASA.

Donated by Litton Systems Inc.

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