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Ink Bottle

This is a clay ink bottle that once contained blue 4001 ink produced by Pelikan. Around the time of World War I, blue 4001 was the most popular ink color sold by Pelikan. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This is a clay ink bottle that once contained blue 4001 ink produced by Pelikan. Around the time of World War I, blue 4001 was the most popular ink color sold by Pelikan. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This is a clay ink bottle that once contained blue 4001 ink produced by Pelikan. Around the time of World War I, blue 4001 was the most popular ink color sold by Pelikan. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This is a clay ink bottle that once contained blue 4001 ink produced by Pelikan. Around the time of World War I, blue 4001 was the most popular ink color sold by Pelikan. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

This is one of five items that provide a special peek into the footlocker of a World War I American soldier. 1st Lt. Carroll DeWitt McClung was a pilot with the 28th Aero Squadron, 3rd Pursuit Group. He was trained as a pilot in the Nieuport aircraft and then flew the SPAD XIII in combat. 

 

This is a clay ink bottle that once contained blue 4001 ink produced by Pelikan. Around the time of World War I, blue 4001 was the most popular ink color sold by Pelikan.

 

To fill a fountain pen with ink, the pen’s nib (tip) would be immersed in the liquid ink. A mechanism on the pen would be used to open up the barrel of the pen allowing the liquid ink to be pulled up into and fill the barrel. The user could control the flow of the ink when writing.

 

This ink bottle is 4-13/16 inches high with a 1-1/2 inch diameter. 

 

Donated by Edgar B. McClung.

 

Click here to return to the Featured World War I Artifacts index.

 

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In accordance with the updated guidance released by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Department of Defense (DoD) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will require all visitors to wear face masks indoors effective July 30, 2021 until further notice.

Visitors ages three and up will be required to wear masks while indoors at the museum. This policy applies to all visitors, staff and volunteers regardless of vaccination status. Visitors may wear their own masks or a free paper mask will be provided. Cloth masks will also be available for purchase in the Museum Store.
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