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Lt. Guy Wiser

On Sept. 26, 1918, Lt. Guy Brown Wiser of the 20th Aero Squadron was shot down during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and captured by German forces. The following day, he was permitted to fill out a card which was mailed to his mother, Alva Wiser, alerting her to his prisoner of war status. Almost a month after the Armistice, Mrs. Wiser would receive another notification -- this time, from The American Red Cross, relaying the happy news that her son had been released from the prison camp and was safe in France. Lt. Wiser returned to the United States in March 1919, aboard the USS Michigan. (U.S. Air Force)

On Sept. 26, 1918, Lt. Guy Brown Wiser of the 20th Aero Squadron was shot down during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and captured by German forces. The following day, he was permitted to fill out a card which was mailed to his mother, Alva Wiser, alerting her to his prisoner of war status. Almost a month after the Armistice, Mrs. Wiser would receive another notification -- this time, from The American Red Cross, relaying the happy news that her son had been released from the prison camp and was safe in France. Lt. Wiser returned to the United States in March 1919, aboard the USS Michigan. (U.S. Air Force)

On Sept. 26, 1918, Lt. Guy Brown Wiser of the 20th Aero Squadron was shot down during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and captured by German forces. The following day, he was permitted to fill out a card which was mailed to his mother, Alva Wiser, alerting her to his prisoner of war status. Almost a month after the Armistice, Mrs. Wiser would receive another notification -- this time, from The American Red Cross, relaying the happy news that her son had been released from the prison camp and was safe in France. Lt. Wiser returned to the United States in March 1919, aboard the USS Michigan. (U.S. Air Force)

On Sept. 26, 1918, Lt. Guy Brown Wiser of the 20th Aero Squadron was shot down during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and captured by German forces. The following day, he was permitted to fill out a card which was mailed to his mother, Alva Wiser, alerting her to his prisoner of war status. Almost a month after the Armistice, Mrs. Wiser would receive another notification -- this time, from The American Red Cross, relaying the happy news that her son had been released from the prison camp and was safe in France. Lt. Wiser returned to the United States in March 1919, aboard the USS Michigan. (U.S. Air Force)

On Sept. 26, 1918, Lt. Guy Brown Wiser of the 20th Aero Squadron was shot down during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and captured by German forces. The following day, he was permitted to fill out a card which was mailed to his mother, Alva Wiser, alerting her to his prisoner of war status. Almost a month after the Armistice, Mrs. Wiser would receive another notification -- this time, from The American Red Cross, relaying the happy news that her son had been released from the prison camp and was safe in France. Lt. Wiser returned to the United States in March 1919, aboard the USS Michigan. (U.S. Air Force)

On Sept. 26, 1918, Lt. Guy Brown Wiser of the 20th Aero Squadron was shot down during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and captured by German forces. The following day, he was permitted to fill out a card which was mailed to his mother, Alva Wiser, alerting her to his prisoner of war status. Almost a month after the Armistice, Mrs. Wiser would receive another notification -- this time, from The American Red Cross, relaying the happy news that her son had been released from the prison camp and was safe in France. Lt. Wiser returned to the United States in March 1919, aboard the USS Michigan. (U.S. Air Force)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

On Sept. 26, 1918, Lt. Guy Brown Wiser of the 20th Aero Squadron was shot down during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and captured by German forces. The following day, he was permitted to fill out a card which was mailed to his mother, Alva Wiser, alerting her to his prisoner of war status.

Almost a month after the Armistice, Mrs. Wiser would receive another notification -- this time, from The American Red Cross, relaying the happy news that her son had been released from the prison camp and was safe in France. Lt. Wiser returned to the United States in March 1919, aboard the USS Michigan.

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Please note Springfield Street, the road that leads to the museum’s entrance, is undergoing construction through the beginning of September. Expect lane reductions and some delays. Please follow the signs and instructions provided by the road crews.

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