HomeVisitMuseum ExhibitsFact SheetsDisplay

Prussian Cavalry Officer Helmet

This spiked helmet, known as a pickelhaube, was originally designed by King Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1842. This helmet design was popular among the Russian and German militaries and police prior to and during World War I. Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, America’s highest scoring ace of WWI, brought this Prussian cavalry officer’s helmet home as a wartime souvenir. It is unknown how he attained it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This spiked helmet, known as a pickelhaube, was originally designed by King Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1842. This helmet design was popular among the Russian and German militaries and police prior to and during World War I. Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, America’s highest scoring ace of WWI, brought this Prussian cavalry officer’s helmet home as a wartime souvenir. It is unknown how he attained it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This spiked helmet, known as a pickelhaube, was originally designed by King Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1842. This helmet design was popular among the Russian and German militaries and police prior to and during World War I. Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, America’s highest scoring ace of WWI, brought this Prussian cavalry officer’s helmet home as a wartime souvenir. It is unknown how he attained it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This spiked helmet, known as a pickelhaube, was originally designed by King Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1842. This helmet design was popular among the Russian and German militaries and police prior to and during World War I. Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, America’s highest scoring ace of WWI, brought this Prussian cavalry officer’s helmet home as a wartime souvenir. It is unknown how he attained it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This spiked helmet, known as a pickelhaube, was originally designed by King Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1842. This helmet design was popular among the Russian and German militaries and police prior to and during World War I. Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, America’s highest scoring ace of WWI, brought this Prussian cavalry officer’s helmet home as a wartime souvenir. It is unknown how he attained it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

This spiked helmet, known as a pickelhaube, was originally designed by King Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1842. This helmet design was popular among the Russian and German militaries and police prior to and during World War I. Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, America’s highest scoring ace of WWI, brought this Prussian cavalry officer’s helmet home as a wartime souvenir. It is unknown how he attained it. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

 

This spiked helmet, known as a pickelhaube (“point” and “bonnet or headgear”), was originally designed by King Frederick Wilhelm IV of Prussia in 1842. This helmet design was popular among the Russian and German militaries and police prior to and during World War I. 

 

A variation of it is still seen today. British police officers on duty in England and Wales wear a custodian helmet, which has a small rounded spike or bump. Most other countries (Colombia, Portugal, Sweden, etc.) still using this style of helmet do so for ceremonial purposes.

 

Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker, America’s highest scoring ace of WWI, brought this Prussian cavalry officer’s helmet home as a wartime souvenir. It is unknown how he attained it.

Donated by the Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker Estate.

Click here to return to the Featured World War I Artifacts index.

 

Find Out More
Line
Related Fact Sheets
Capt. Edward V. Rickenbacker
Kaiser Wilhelm II Cigarette Case
Line
Note: The appearance of hyperlinks does not constitute endorsement by the National Museum of the USAF, the U.S. Air Force, or the Department of Defense, of the external website, or the information, products or services contained therein.

Please note Springfield Street, the road that leads to the museum’s entrance, is undergoing construction through the beginning of September. Expect lane reductions and some delays. Please follow the signs and instructions provided by the road crews.

Featured Links

Plan Your Visit button
E-newsletter Sign-up button
Explore Museum Exhibits button
Browse Photos button
Visit Press Room button
Become a Volunteer button
Air Force Museum Foundation button
Donate an item button