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Metatarsal Pads

Combat boots during World War I tended to lack the cushion and shock absorption that modern-day combat boots are designed to have. These metatarsal pads were worn with the elastic strap over the top of one’s foot. They hold the pad in place over the bottom and just behind the ball of the foot at the arch that runs across the width of the foot. These pads provided comfort and helped prevent pain and numbness caused by overextension of the toes and arch during long marches and constant standing. These WWI pads are leather stuffed with cloth and batting. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Combat boots during World War I tended to lack the cushion and shock absorption that modern-day combat boots are designed to have. These metatarsal pads were worn with the elastic strap over the top of one’s foot. They hold the pad in place over the bottom and just behind the ball of the foot at the arch that runs across the width of the foot. These pads provided comfort and helped prevent pain and numbness caused by overextension of the toes and arch during long marches and constant standing. These WWI pads are leather stuffed with cloth and batting. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Note: This item is currently in storage.

 

Combat boots during World War I tended to lack the cushion and shock absorption that modern-day combat boots are designed to have. These metatarsal pads were worn with the elastic strap over the top of one’s foot. They hold the pad in place over the bottom and just behind the ball of the foot at the arch that runs across the width of the foot. These pads provided comfort and helped prevent pain and numbness caused by overextension of the toes and arch during long marches and constant standing. These WWI pads are leather stuffed with cloth and batting. Today’s metatarsal pads are primarily made of silicone gel.

 

These metatarsal pads are approximately 3-1/8 inches high by 2-1/16 inches wide. 

Donated by Lavere Harrington Post #2320 VFW.

Click here to return to the Featured World War I Artifacts index.

Please note Springfield Street, the road that leads to the museum’s entrance, is undergoing construction through the beginning of September. Expect lane reductions and some delays. Please follow the signs and instructions provided by the road crews.

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