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The Memphis Belle: American Icon

The crew of the "Memphis Belle"® after their 25th mission: (l to r) TSgt. Harold Loch (top turret gunner/engineer), SSg.t Cecil Scott (ball turret gunner), TSgt. Robert Hanson (radio operator), Capt. James Verinis (copilot), Capt. Robert Morgan (pilot), Capt. Charles Leighton (navigator), SSgt. John Quinlan (tail gunner), SSgt. Casimer Nastal (waist gunner), Capt. Vincent Evans (bombardier), and SSgt. Clarence Winchell (waist gunner). (U.S. Air Force photo)

The crew of the "Memphis Belle" after their 25th mission: (l to r) TSgt. Harold Loch (top turret gunner/engineer), SSg.t Cecil Scott (ball turret gunner), TSgt. Robert Hanson (radio operator), Capt. James Verinis (copilot), Capt. Robert Morgan (pilot), Capt. Charles Leighton (navigator), SSgt. John Quinlan (tail gunner), SSgt. Casimer Nastal (waist gunner), Capt. Vincent Evans (bombardier), and SSgt. Clarence Winchell (waist gunner). (U.S. Air Force photo)

Memphis Belle crew and ground crew celebrating the completion of the tour.

Memphis Belle crew and ground crew celebrating the completion of the tour.

Capt. Robert Morgan, Memphis Belle pilot, thanking his ground crew.  (l to r) Cpl Oliver Champion, SSgt Max Armstrong, Sgt Ware Lipscomb, Sgt Leonard Sowers, Sgt Charles Blauser, Sgt Robert Walters, and crew chief MSgt Joseph Giambrone

Capt. Robert Morgan, Memphis Belle pilot, thanking his ground crew. (l to r) Cpl Oliver Champion, SSgt Max Armstrong, Sgt Ware Lipscomb, Sgt Leonard Sowers, Sgt Charles Blauser, Sgt Robert Walters, and crew chief MSgt Joseph Giambrone

On May 26, 1943, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited the Memphis Belle crew at Bassingbourn after they finished their tour.

On May 26, 1943, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited the Memphis Belle crew at Bassingbourn after they finished their tour.


The Memphis Belle and its crew became timeless symbols of the service and sacrifice of the heavy bomber crews and support personnel who helped defeat Nazi Germany.  This famed aircraft was the first US Army Air Forces heavy bomber to return to the United States after completing 25 missions over Europe.


The Memphis Belle was a B-17F heavy bomber assigned to the 324th Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group, at Bassingbourn, England, during the early part of the USAAF strategic bombing campaign.  Between November 1942 and May 1943, the Memphis Belle and its crew flew 25 bombing missions, including strikes against targets in Germany, France, and Belgium.

At the time, the odds of completing a 25-mission tour and going home were small.  During the Memphis Belle’s tour, the Eighth Air Force averaged one bomber lost every 18 sorties (one sortie equals one aircraft flying one combat mission).

Although the Memphis Belle was damaged on several combat missions, the crew beat the odds and completed their 25th mission on May 17, 1943.  The crew then returned home for a war bond tour across America.


Tail gunner SSgt John Quinlan was wounded during a raid on Rouen, France, on March 28, 1943.  He was the only member of the Memphis Belle crew to receive the Purple Heart.

 

 


 

Flak damage that holed the Memphis Belle’s tail and wounded Quinlan’s right leg.

 

 

 


TSgt Robert Hanson, radio operator, kissing the ground after the 25th mission.

 

 


 

Memphis Belle’s 25th Mission

Due to aircraft availability, the crew assigned to the Memphis Belle flew five of their 25 combat missions on other B-17s.  Conversely, the Memphis Belle was flown on five combat missions with an entirely different crew—in total, more than 50 Airmen flew combat missions on the Memphis Belle

As a result, the Memphis Belle crew’s 25th mission on May 17, 1943, was actually the aircraft’s 24th mission.  On May 19, two days later, the Memphis Belle completed its 25th mission while manned by a different crew.

 


Memphis Belle out of commission while combat damage is repaired.

 

 


Damage report completed by Memphis Belle crew chief MSgt Joseph Giambrone indicating combat damage to be repaired, including the tail.

 

 

Related Fact Sheets

 

Memphis Belle Crew

The “Memphis Belle” and Nose Art

26th Mission: War Bond Tour

Memphis Belle: A Story of a Flying Fortress”

Heavy Bomber “Firsts”

Combat Aircraft to Museum Artifact

Crippling the Nazi War Machine: USAAF Strategic Bombing in Europe

 

 

 

Return to B-17F Memphis Belle Fact Sheet

 

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