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Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A

DAYTON, Ohio -- Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Ken LaRock)

Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

DAYTON, Ohio -- Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The XC-142 in hovering flight. The wing/engine group has been pivoted and the propellers are functioning as the rotors of a helicopter to lift the aircraft for vertical flight. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The XC-142 in hovering flight. The wing/engine group has been pivoted and the propellers are functioning as the rotors of a helicopter to lift the aircraft for vertical flight. (U.S. Air Force photo)

With the wings tilted up, an XC-142A took off and landed like a helicopter. The wings could be tilted forward to provide the speed of a fixed-wing aircraft. The engines were linked together so that a single engine could turn all four propellers and the tail rotor (the tail rotor provided pitch control while in vertical flight). (U.S. Air Force photo)

With the wings tilted up, an XC-142A took off and landed like a helicopter. The wings could be tilted forward to provide the speed of a fixed-wing aircraft. The engines were linked together so that a single engine could turn all four propellers and the tail rotor (the tail rotor provided pitch control while in vertical flight). (U.S. Air Force photo)

With the wings tilted up, an XC-142A took off and landed like a helicopter. The wings could be tilted forward to provide the speed of a fixed-wing aircraft. The engines were linked together so that a single engine could turn all four propellers and the tail rotor (the tail rotor provided pitch control while in vertical flight). (U.S. Air Force photo)

With the wings tilted up, an XC-142A took off and landed like a helicopter. The wings could be tilted forward to provide the speed of a fixed-wing aircraft. The engines were linked together so that a single engine could turn all four propellers and the tail rotor (the tail rotor provided pitch control while in vertical flight). (U.S. Air Force photo)

Restoration staff move the Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Nov. 22, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Don Popp)
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Restoration staff move the Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Nov. 22, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Don Popp)

Restoration staff move the Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Nov. 22, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Don Popp)
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Restoration staff move the Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Nov. 22, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Don Popp)

Restoration staff move the Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A and the Convair NC-131H Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS)  into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Nov. 22, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Don Popp)
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Restoration staff move the Chance-Vought/LTV XC-142A and the Convair NC-131H Total In-Flight Simulator (TIFS) into the new fourth building at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Nov. 22, 2015. (U.S. Air Force photo by Don Popp)


Five tilt-wing XC-142As were built in the 1960s to explore the suitability of Vertical/Short TakeOff and Landing (VSTOL) transports. VSTOL transports permit rapid movement of troops and supplies into and out of unprepared areas. XC-142As were tested extensively by the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force and NASA.

An XC-142A first flew conventionally in September 1964 and performed its first transitional flight (vertical takeoff, changing to forward flight, and landing vertically) in January 1965. In tests, XC-142As were flown from airspeeds of 35 mph backwards to 400 mph forward.

Although the XC-142A did not go into production, it foreshadowed future operational VSTOL transports like the V-22 Osprey. The aircraft on display -- the only remaining XC-142A -- was flown to the museum in 1970.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Engines:
Four General Electric T64s of 3,080 hp each
Maximum speed: 400 mph
Cruising speed: 235 mph
Range: 820 miles
Service ceiling: 25,000 feet
Weight: 41,500 lbs. maximum

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