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  • Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit

    The Space Shuttle Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) represents the most advanced system used in spacewalking. Variations of this design have been used since 1981 in the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs. Over the years it has undergone many incremental improvements.The Shuttle

  • Model A7LB Extravehicular Mobility Unit—1971

    The Apollo model A7LB was the ultimate moonwalking suit. This Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) allowed a crewman to work on the moon for up to seven hours. The suit’s red stripes identified the mission commander. This one represents the one worn by US Air Force Col David Scott in July 1971 on

  • Model A7L Space Suit—1969

    This suit represents the model A7L worn by U.S. Air Force Col. (later Maj. Gen.) Michael Collins in July 1969 on Apollo 11, the first moon landing mission. Collins’ suit was not made for moonwalking, but instead was designed to be worn mainly inside the spacecraft. He piloted the orbiting command

  • Gemini G4C Space Suit—1966

    Gemini missions lasted up to 14 days and featured the first American spacewalks, where crewmen ventured outside their spacecraft. The Gemini program (1965–66) included 12 flights with two crewmen each, and eight Gemini astronauts were US Air Force officers.The G4C suit was the most common of three

  • Mercury Space Suit—1963

    Early space suits for the Mercury program (1961–63) were derived from a 1959 US Navy aviation suit design. The tight-fitting suit served as a backup to keep the astronaut alive in the tiny Mercury spacecraft if the vehicle developed a leak and lost its atmosphere.This suit represents the one worn by

  • 1951 Northrop YC-125B

    Note:  This aircraft was offered for exchange as part of NMUSAF Solicitation 19-002 (Closed).1951 Northrop YC-125B (S/N 48626 / C/N 2510) Aircraft Project, owned by the National Museum of the United States Air Force (NMUSAF) and determined excess to collection needs.  Aircraft has three Wright

  • 1944 Curtiss A-25A

    Note:  This aircraft was offered for exchange as part of NMUSAF Solicitation 19-002 (Closed).1944 Curtiss A-25A (S/N 42-80449 / BuNo 76805) Aircraft Project, owned by the National Museum of the United States Air Force (NMUSAF) and determined excess to collection needs.  Aircraft has a Wright

  • OPERATION OVERLORD: D-Day

    D-Day, June 6, 1944—history’s largest amphibious invasion—sparked the liberation of Europe. Airmen enabled its success by breaking the Luftwaffe, crippling enemy transportation, gathering intelligence, and directly supporting Allied ground forces.         What is “D-Day”?“D-Day” was the general

  • A-7D Sit-In Cockpit

    Note: Visitors are permitted to sit in this cockpit.This A-7D ejection seat trainer familiarized pilots with proper ejection procedures during simulated in-flight emergencies. The LTV A-7 Corsair II was a single-seat attack aircraft flown by the US Air Force from 1968 until its retirement in the

  • Fairchild Republic A-10A Thunderbolt II

    The A-10 was designed specifically for close air support of ground forces. It is named for the famous P-47 Thunderbolt, a fighter often used in a close air support role during World War II. The A-10 is very maneuverable at low speeds and low altitudes to ensure accurate weapon delivery, and it

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