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Fact Sheet Alphabetical List

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  • American Helicopter Co. XH-26 Jet Jeep

    In 1951 at the request of the U.S. Army, the U.S. Air Force developed the XH-26, a one-man, pulsejet-driven helicopter. Rather than having an internal engine like other helicopters, the Jet Jeep was powered by two pulsejets on the end of each rotor blade tip. American Helicopter chose the name

  • Avro Canada VZ-9AV Avrocar

    The Avrocar was the result of a Canadian effort to develop a supersonic, vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) fighter-bomber in the early 1950s. However, its circular shape gave it the appearance of a “flying saucer” out of science fiction movies of the period.A.V. Roe (Avro) Aircraft Limited (later

  • Aero Commander U-4B

    This U-4B, a U.S. Air Force version of the Aero Commander L-26, was used by President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1956 to 1960 for short trips. A pilot himself, President Eisenhower would often take the controls, primarily during trips between Washington, D.C., and his farm in Gettysburg, Penn. The

  • Austro-Hungarian Transportation Corp Collar Insignia

    Note: This item is currently in storage. This insignia was worn by members of the Transportation Corp of the Austro-Hungarian Army.  The Austro-Hungarian Army was the combined military force of Austria and Hungary during World War I. The three components of this Army were the Common Army (soldiers

  • Allison YT-56-A-3 Turboprop

    The T-56, a jet engine that uses a propeller to produce most of its thrust, was originally designed to power the Lockheed C-130 Hercules. Because the T-56 compressor and turbine rotate at a high speed (13,820 rpm), a reduction gearbox is used to allow the propeller to turn at a much slower, more

  • Aviation Section Enlisted Patch

    Note: This item is currently in storage.This is an insignia patch worn by enlisted personnel of the Aviation Section of the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War I. On May 24, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson transferred the Aviation Section from the Signal Corps to the newly established U.S. Army

  • Aviation Section Aviation Mechanic Patch

    Note: This item is currently in storage.This is an insignia patch worn by aviation mechanics of the U.S. Army Signal Corps, Aviation Section during World War I. On May 24, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson transferred the Aviation Section from the Signal Corps to the newly established U.S. Army Air

  • Arctic/Cold Weather Balloon Anchor

    Note: This item is currently in storage.This item is a metal anchor plate that was developed to be the ground contact for an observation balloon attached to it by mooring lines. Balloons would be held stationary in the Arctic regions or northern European regions during the winter months by pouring a

  • Anti-Aircraft Unit Patch

    Note: This item is currently in storage.This winged ammunition patch is the insignia for U.S. anti-aircraft units during World War I. With anti-aircraft being in its wartime infancy during WWI, U.S. Army anti-aircraft personnel had to learn in the field. These soldiers quickly gained proficiency in

  • AN/MRN-12A Mobile Control Tower

    Note: This item is currently in storage.The AN/MRN-12A was used by the USAF from the 1950s into the 1970s for controlling aircraft on and near airfields, primarily during takeoffs and landings, when such airfields had no permanent control tower facilities. Under normal conditions, the mobile control